Fanaticism

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Fanaticism

See also Extremism.
Adamites
various sects preaching a return to life before the fall. [Christian Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 8]
assassins
Moslem murder teams used hashish as stimulus (11th and 12th centuries). [Islamic Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 52]
Fakirs
mendicant Indian sects bent on self-punishment for salvation. [Asian Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 310]
flagellants
various Christian sects practising self-punishment. [Christian Hist.: Brewer Note-Book, 331–332]
Harmony Society Harmonists,
also Rappites; subscribed to austere doctrines, such as celibacy, and therefore no longer exist (since 1960). [Am. Hist.: NCE, 910]
Hitler, Adolf (1889–1945) German
dictator tried to conquer the world. [Ger. Hist.: Hitler]
Shakers (or Alethians)
received their name from the trembling produced by excesses of religious emotion; because of doctrine of celibacy, Shakers are all but extinct. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 1938]
References in classic literature ?
Catharine's fanaticism had become wilder by the sundering of all human ties; and wherever a scourge was lifted there was she to receive the blow, and whenever a dungeon was unbarred thither she came, to cast herself upon the floor.
Between the mutually perpetuating fanaticisms of the suicide bombers and the militant Israeli right, Jacir hollows a tentative aesthetic space in which it's possible to sense, without feeling obliged to make excuses for the savagery of either side, the bitterness of exile.
One of the book's shortcomings is Berman's argument that the world of Islam and its fanaticisms are really not so exotic or distinct from the intellectual and ideological history of Europe.
Though this way of thinking about Islamist fanaticism has largely been the province of the right, Berman is a man of the left--and, just as important, the right part of the left.
In the eighteenth century, when the philosophers of the Enlightenment dismissed her as a laughable object of dispute between Catholic and Protestant fanaticisms, the popess found a renewed existence in literature.