fasces


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fasces

(făs`ēz) [Lat.,=bundles], ancient Roman symbol of the regal and later the magisterial authority. The fasces were cylindrical bundles of wooden rods, tied tightly together, from which an axe projected; they were borne by guards, called lictors, before praetors, consuls, proconsuls, dictators, and emperors. The fasces, which symbolize unity as well as power, have often been used as emblems, e.g., on the arms of the French republic and on American coins. Italian Fascism derived its name and its emblem from the fasces.

Fasces

 

in ancient Rome, a bundle of rods strapped together, from which a small ax protruded. The fasces was a symbol of imperial authority; later it came to symbolize the authority of high magistrates and was carried by attending lictors. The Italian Fascists adopted the fasces as their emblem.

fasces

A symbol of Roman authority consisting of a bundle of rods with an ax blade projecting from them.

fasces

rods bundled about ax; emblem of magistrates, Fascists. [Rom. Hist.: Hall, 119; Ital. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 399]
References in periodicals archive ?
In ancient Rome, fasces were carried by retainers in front of governmental officials as they moved about to signify the power of their office.
Seated in the painted clouds of the backcloth was the Genius of France, dressed in blue and holding a crown and sceptre, flanked by Peace (with a laurel branch), Fidelity (guarding a flame), Royal Authority, Justice (holding the fasces of ancient Roman magistrates) and Abundance (with her cornucopia).
The Main de Justice (Hand of Justice) is prominent beside him and the figure of Justice and bundled fasces of Roman magistrates decorate the gilded throne behind him.
forward turret out of fog by whom the bundled fasces or
There is also an explanation of the fasces (centerpiece of the Regimental Crest).
Aeneas is bound tight to Dido, as is the sailor to the Sirens, and in the fasces, the bundle of rods to the axe.
The prominence of the fasces in the centre should also have warned him to look again since it became the dominant symbol of the unity and indivisibility of the Republic.
A vocabulary of Liberty caps, fasces, equilateral triangles, goddesses of Liberty and Equality resacralized the nation.
18) At all the festivals, special significance was given to the fasces (rods), (19) which--as Livy describes in The Early History of Rome--were first held by Lucius Junius Brutus, the founder of the Republic:
The establishment of Revolutionary Paris as the 'new Rome', with its processions of people carrying fasces and bonnets and dressed 'a l'antique' (Fig.
Following them, on the chariot of Victory, a symbolic fasces bearing fourteen crowns was to be linked by tricoloured ribbons to fourteen laurel wreaths held by veterans selected from each of the preceding chariots.