fascia


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Related to fascia: Colles fascia

fascia

(făsh`ēə), fibrous tissue network located between the skin and the underlying structure of muscle and bone. Fascia is composed of two layers, a superficial layer and a deep layer. Superficial fascia is attached to the skin and is composed of connective tissue containing varying quantities of fat. It is especially dense in the scalp, the back of the neck, and the palms of the hands, where it serves to anchor the skin firmly to underlying tissues. In other areas of the body it is loose and the skin may be moved freely back and forth. Deep fascia underlies the superficial layers, to which it is loosely joined by fibrous strands. It is thin but strong and densely packed, and serves to cover the muscles and to partition them into groups.

Fascia

A broad horizontal member or molding with nominal thickness, projecting from the wall.

Fascia

 

an architectural element in the form of a rectangular projection. Fasciae are seen at the base of columns and as part of cornices. They are not always only decorative elements. A fascia may be used to support the cross pieces forming the icon shelf of an iconostasis or to protect a wall from water seepage. In the latter case, the fascia usually slopes away from the wall, forming a stone drip.


Fascia

 

the connective tissue investing organs, vessels, and nerves and forming the sheaths of muscles in man and other vertebrate animals; it performs supporting and trophic functions.

Superficial, or subcutaneous, fasciae are located under a fatty subcutaneous layer; in man, fasciae under the skin of the sole and the palm and under the scalp form aponeuroses. Deep fasciae invest individual muscles or muscle groups. Outgrowths of deep fasciae form intermuscular barriers, which may serve as points of muscle termination and attachment. In many parts of the body, especially in the extremities, the fascial system acts as a spring. When muscles contract, the fasciae shift their position, compressing or relaxing the neural and vascular sheaths, thus facilitating the flow of blood toward the heart. Some fasciae, such as the endothoracic fascia, line internal cavities. Fasciae are richly supplied with blood vessels and nerves.

fascia

[′fā·shə]
(building construction)
A wide board fixed vertically on edge to the rafter ends or wall which carries the gutter around the eaves of a roof.
(histology)
Layers of areolar connective tissue under the skin and between muscles, nerves, and blood vessels.

fascia, facia

1. Any flat horizontal member or molding with little projection, as the bands into which the architraves of Ionic and Corinthian entablatures are divided.
2. Any relatively narrow vertical surface (but broader than a fillet) which is projected or cantilevered or supported on columns or element other than a wall below. Also see platband.

fascia

, facia
1. the flat surface above a shop window
2. Architect a flat band or surface, esp a part of an architrave or cornice
3. Anatomy fibrous connective tissue occurring in sheets beneath the surface of the skin and between muscles and groups of muscles
4. Biology a distinctive band of colour, as on an insect or plant
5. Brit a less common name for dashboard
References in periodicals archive ?
Ademas, la alta reaccion de las fuerzas en el suelo durante la locomocion tambien podrian colocar mayores cargas en la fascia plantar.
When it comes to human fascia, the raccoon in the story got it right: Pay attention to the fascia and how it moves.
Metal-Era has delivered quick-to-ship fascia products to customers for years.
According to Mohamed Al lackany, Nadia Nassif Sarkis due to the lack of elasticity and resistance to pressure changes in the external ear canal, several authors has suggested that temporalis muscle fascia should be replaced by cartilage or strengthened by periosteium.
In mild cases, fascia is thinned out with no demonstrable defect.
Judith and Norman, from Smart Therapies, have done post graduate training in Fascia Bowen, and have experience with treating children with varying disabilities.
It is important to attempt to define the word fascia, as it does not have a clear and concise definition.
However autologous fascia lata has proven to be the method of choice in sling surgery for ptosis.
A trapezoid-shaped structure of pubocervical fascia serves as a kind of hammock on which the bladder is believed to passively rest.
In walking and running, this area of fascia acts as a kind of 'bungee' and greatly reduces the amount of effort that is needed to exert via the muscular system.
As more patients express reservations about the placement of synthetic mesh during sling procedures, the use of autologous rectus fascia pubovaginal slings has risen.