fascia

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fascia

(făsh`ēə), fibrous tissue network located between the skin and the underlying structure of muscle and bone. Fascia is composed of two layers, a superficial layer and a deep layer. Superficial fascia is attached to the skin and is composed of connective tissue containing varying quantities of fat. It is especially dense in the scalp, the back of the neck, and the palms of the hands, where it serves to anchor the skin firmly to underlying tissues. In other areas of the body it is loose and the skin may be moved freely back and forth. Deep fascia underlies the superficial layers, to which it is loosely joined by fibrous strands. It is thin but strong and densely packed, and serves to cover the muscles and to partition them into groups.

Fascia

A broad horizontal member or molding with nominal thickness, projecting from the wall.

Fascia

 

an architectural element in the form of a rectangular projection. Fasciae are seen at the base of columns and as part of cornices. They are not always only decorative elements. A fascia may be used to support the cross pieces forming the icon shelf of an iconostasis or to protect a wall from water seepage. In the latter case, the fascia usually slopes away from the wall, forming a stone drip.


Fascia

 

the connective tissue investing organs, vessels, and nerves and forming the sheaths of muscles in man and other vertebrate animals; it performs supporting and trophic functions.

Superficial, or subcutaneous, fasciae are located under a fatty subcutaneous layer; in man, fasciae under the skin of the sole and the palm and under the scalp form aponeuroses. Deep fasciae invest individual muscles or muscle groups. Outgrowths of deep fasciae form intermuscular barriers, which may serve as points of muscle termination and attachment. In many parts of the body, especially in the extremities, the fascial system acts as a spring. When muscles contract, the fasciae shift their position, compressing or relaxing the neural and vascular sheaths, thus facilitating the flow of blood toward the heart. Some fasciae, such as the endothoracic fascia, line internal cavities. Fasciae are richly supplied with blood vessels and nerves.

fascia

[′fā·shə]
(building construction)
A wide board fixed vertically on edge to the rafter ends or wall which carries the gutter around the eaves of a roof.
(histology)
Layers of areolar connective tissue under the skin and between muscles, nerves, and blood vessels.

fascia, facia

1. Any flat horizontal member or molding with little projection, as the bands into which the architraves of Ionic and Corinthian entablatures are divided.
2. Any relatively narrow vertical surface (but broader than a fillet) which is projected or cantilevered or supported on columns or element other than a wall below. Also see platband.

fascia

, facia
1. the flat surface above a shop window
2. Architect a flat band or surface, esp a part of an architrave or cornice
3. Anatomy fibrous connective tissue occurring in sheets beneath the surface of the skin and between muscles and groups of muscles
4. Biology a distinctive band of colour, as on an insect or plant
5. Brit a less common name for dashboard
References in periodicals archive ?
When defining fascial tissue via anatomical dissections, it may be difficult to define it only structurally, especially if fascial tissue has a dynamic and widespread role.
The American Council on Exercise recommends that the warm-up phase also include some fascial training to properly prepare the body for activity.
7) The majority of surgeons agree that a watertight closure of the fascia is necessary to prevent pseudomeningocele; however, newer, minimally-invasive techniques, which utilize smaller fascial incisions, have made watertight fascial closures less critical.
15,16,18,38) A grade I (well differentiated) cutaneous mast cell tumor is likely to be completely excised by using the recommended 2- to 3-cm lateral margins and one fascial plane for a deep margin, whereas a grade III (poorly differentiated) tumor is more likely to have metastasized.
Nearly two-thirds of the gynaecologists still preferred a traditional technique, including fascial plication (10%), levator plication (5%) or posterior repair (48%) (Table I).
By focusing on the fascial relationships of our body's components, we can integrate our structure into a more efficient energy system.
In some cases, magnetic resonance imaging can be helpful in demonstrating involvement at the fascial level.
It is important to understand the anatomy of the fascial spaces connecting the neck and pharynx to the mediastinum since infection should be intercepted and drained there.
In the one reported case of supraglottitis with cervical necrotizing fasciitis (10), fascial gas was demonstrated on CT scan.
When a strep skin infection gets deeper into the skin (so-called cellulitis), it can reach the tough fascial layer beneath the skin.
Surgical wound infections (SWI) by class Joint OP sites (incisional) 1 Joint OP site (deep) 0 OP sites other than joints, above fascial layer (incision) 1 Other OP sites (deep), drainage below fascial layer 1