fat necrosis


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Related to fat necrosis: Subcutaneous fat necrosis

fat necrosis

[¦fat nə′krō·səs]
(medicine)
Pathologic death of adipose tissue often accompanied by soap production from the hydrolyzed fat; associated with pancreatitis.
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This leads to crystal formation, fat necrosis, and inflammation when the fat is subjected to such stresses as vascular compromise or trauma.
Malignant (18%; 31/177) Invasive ductal carcinoma 13 Invasive lobular carcinoma 4 Ductal carcinoma in situ 12 Invasive mixed carcinoma 1 Tubular carcinoma 1 Atypical epithelial hyperplasia (11%; 20/177) Atypical ductal hyperplasia 3 Lobular neoplasia 17 (12 ALH, 5 LCIS) Benign (71%;126/177) Benign breast diagnoses (105/126) Fibrocystic changes with/without 31 epithelial hyperplasia Columnar cell lesions 30 Fibroadenoma and 14 fibroadenomatoid change Ductal ectasia 7 Radial sclerosing lesion 6 Papilloma 7 PASH 5 Intramammary lymph node 3 Fat necrosis 1 Hemangioma 1 Normal breast tissue (21/126) Abbreviations: ALH, atypical lobular hyperplasia; LCIS, lobular carcinoma in situ;PASH, pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia.
Fat necrosis of the breast clinical, mammographic and sonographic features.
Different from the lesions of granulomatous mastitis, the three most common sonogaphic shapes in patients with fat necrosis was cystic nodules with sharp margins, solid masses with a boundary echo, and complicated echogenicity accompanied with a thick hyperechoic encysted band.
As a result of fat necrosis, such abscesses may manifest as numerous pockets with multiple, interconnected foci.
One case developed subcutaneous fat necrosis right flank around the drain site.
Final gross and histologic diagnosis was granulomatous fat necrosis causing extraluminal obstruction of the colon.
Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn: a systematic evaluation of risk factors, clinical manifestations, complications and outcome of 16 children.
Histology findings of haemorrhagic infarction and fat necrosis confirm the diagnosis with the presence of fibrosis indicative of a longer disease process.
The most striking pathologic findings in the excised specimen were seen in the subcutaneous tissue; there was extensive fat necrosis, with abundant amorphous eosinophilic and amphophilic debris replacing, and interspersed between, adipocytes (FIGURE 3).
Stage 2 is a transitional stage of partial fat necrosis and focal