feather joint

feather joint

[′feth·ər ‚jȯint]
(engineering)
A joint made by cutting a mating groove in each of the pieces to be joined and inserting a feather in the opening formed when the pieces are butted together. Also known as ploughed-and-tongued joint.
(geology)
One of a series of joints in a fault zone formed by shear and tension. Also known as pinnate joint.

feather joint

feather joint
A joint between two closely fitting boards which have been squared and butted against each other; a groove is cut along the length of each board in which a common tongue is fitted.
References in periodicals archive ?
The feather joint is used when stock dimension varies significantly (Wisconsin Knife Works 2000).
The feather joint has the highest mean UTS value compared to either male-female or reverse profiles (34 MPa compared to 31 and 30 MPa, respectively).
Since in flatwise bending the shoulders are resisting the tensile stress developed at the bottom fibers, higher tensile strength can be achieved with feather joints compared to male-female or reverse joints.