fellow


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fellow

1. (at Oxford and Cambridge universities) a member of the governing body of a college, who is usually a member of the teaching staff
2. a member of the governing body or established teaching staff at any of various universities or colleges
3. a postgraduate student employed, esp for a fixed period, to undertake research and, often, to do some teaching

Fellow

a member of any of various learned societies
References in classic literature ?
The landlord, who was a very civil fellow, told Jones, "He hoped he would excuse the badness of his accommodation; for that his wife was gone from home, and had locked up almost everything, and carried the keys along with her.
I had provided her a proper match, a sober man and one of substance; but she, forsooth, would chuse for herself, and away she is gone with a young fellow not worth a groat.
Thrice did Robin smite the scarlet man--with such blows that a less stout fellow must have bowled over.
He has had a steward, a surly fellow enough, who, while I was away at school, boot-licked his way to favor until he lorded it over the whole house.
Joe was usually such a quiet, gentle little fellow that it was wonderful to see him so roused.
you did right, my boy, whether the fellow gets a summons or not.
I know where there is a fellow who doesn't need his clothes anymore, and if we can get back on this roof I think we can find him and get his apparel without much resistance.
There was, however, the chance that the fellow had been captured in childhood and that through long years of non-use his native language had become lost to him, but then there always had been an element of chance connected with nearly every event of Tarzan's life, so he waited patiently until in the performance of his duties the black man approached a little table which stood near the niche in which Tarzan and the Englishman hid.
You see, my dear fellow, I have been thinking about you," said Prince Andrew when they had gone into the large room where the clavichord was.
It was knowing to hold forth, in the humble-virtue school of eloquence; but, I assure you I thought at the time, "My good fellow, you are over-doing this
But let me tell thee, thou stout fellow, gin thou be a good friend it were well for us both; but gin thou be no good friend it were ill for thee.
It is these good fellows that he gets--the fellows with the fire and the go in them, who have bigness, and warmness, and the best of the human weaknesses.