felony

(redirected from felonious)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

felony

(fĕl`ənē), any grave crime, in contrast to a misdemeanormisdemeanor,
in law, a minor crime, in contrast to a felony. At common law a misdemeanor was a crime other than treason or a felony. Although it might be a grave offense, it did not affect the feudal bond or take away the offender's property. By the 19th cent.
..... Click the link for more information.
, that is so declared in statute or was so considered in common lawcommon law,
system of law that prevails in England and in countries colonized by England. The name is derived from the medieval theory that the law administered by the king's courts represented the common custom of the realm, as opposed to the custom of local jurisdiction that
..... Click the link for more information.
. In early English law a felony was a heinous act that canceled the perpetrator's feudal rights and forfeited his lands and goods to the king, thus depriving his prospective heirs of their inheritance. The accused might be tried by an appeal of felony, i.e., personal combat with his accuser, the losing party to be adjudged a felon (see ordealordeal,
ancient legal custom whereby an accused person was required to perform a test, the outcome of which decided the person's guilt or innocence. By an ordeal, appeal was made to divine authority to decide the guilt or innocence of one accused of a crime or to choose between
..... Click the link for more information.
). The appeal of felony was gradually replaced by rational modes of trial and was altogether abolished in England in 1819. In addition to the forfeiture of his property, the convicted felon usually suffered death, long imprisonment, or banishment. Death was an especially common English penalty in the 18th and the early 19th cent. To the list of common-law felonies—including murder, rape, theft, arson, and suicide—many others were added by statute. With the abolition of forfeitures in England in 1870 the felony acquired essentially its modern character. Felony is used in various senses in the United States. In federal law, any crime punishable by death or more than one year's imprisonment is a felony. This definition is followed in some states; in others the common-law definition is retained, or else statutes specifically label certain crimes as felonies. Other possible consequences of committing a felony are loss of the rights of citizenship, deportationdeportation,
expulsion of an alien from a country by an act of its government. The term is not applied ordinarily to sending a national into exile or to committing one convicted of crime to an overseas penal colony (historically called transportation).
..... Click the link for more information.
 if the felon is an alien, and liability to a more severe sentencesentence,
in criminal law, punishment that a court orders, imposed on a person convicted of criminal activity. Sentences typically consist of fines, corporal punishment, imprisonment for varying periods including life, or capital punishment, and sometimes combine two or more
..... Click the link for more information.
 for successive offenses. Felonies are usually tried by jury, and in some states the accused must first have been indicted by a grand jurygrand jury,
in law, body of persons selected to inquire into crimes committed within a certain jurisdiction. It usually comprises a greater number than the trial, or petit (also, petty) jury, having since early common law days had between 12 and 23 members.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

felony

(formerly) a serious crime, such as murder or arson. All distinctions between felony and misdemeanour were abolished in England and Wales in 1967
References in periodicals archive ?
Law enforcement agencies identified 69 alleged assailants in connection with the 56 felonious line-of-duty deaths.
Davis' attorney, Greg Cohen, argued that the state law regarding HIV and felonious assault is poorly written because it does not require proof that there has been harm or an attempt to commit harm.
In 2012, 48 law enforcement officers died from injuries incurred in the line of duty during felonious incidents.
Thanks to the fallout of the felonious hedging deal, the country will have to pay three foreign banks US$261million plus interest.
Dickie, 25, of Heath, was charged with individual counts of aggravated robbery, felonious assault and felony theft and held at the Southeastern Ohio Regional Jail in Nelsonville," the Dispatch reported.
JIM RYAN: The former Democratic state rep from Franklin, whose financially felonious past was revealed earlier this year, is released from jail in order to begin paying restitution.
Dauphinee is wanted on three counts of felonious sexual assault against children, stemming from an investigation by the Allenstown, N.
Mohammad Taheri-Azar, 25, was originally charged with nine counts of attempted murder and nine counts of felonious assault in connection with the March 3, 2006, incident at a popular outdoor gathering spot at the UNC campus, which injured nine people, none of them seriously.
It strikes me as the ultimate irony that the bishops, "men of God," could have so easily bought into the atheistically inspired psychobabble idea of "curing" the felonious priests under their direction.
The fete held over at Merry Karnowski's spot in LA was well attended by both mavens of taste and a few felonious improvisers.
But in losing 4-0 to Blackpool, Coventry were not just poor, they were recklessly felonious too.
And it would compound the felonious assault on public trust that City Hall committed by imposing the trash fee as a service charge when it was really a tax for more cops and thus should have been put before voters.