femininity

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femininity

the characteristics associated with the female sex. The historical (often masculinist) study of femininity documents feminine identity linked to passivity nurturing, co-operation, gentleness and relation to motherhood, with an emphasis upon the relegation of women to the private sphere, the sphere of domesticity Feminists and sociologists have challenged the stereotypes relating to ‘femininity’, ‘feminine identity’ and the binary categories man/mind, woman/nature which dominate many conceptions of sexual difference, including the reduction of sociocultural processes to biological givens. For French feminist theorists (e.g. CIXOUS, KRISTEVA) ‘feminine’ is an arbitrary category given to woman's appearance or behaviour by patriarchy For Sue Lees (Sugar and Spice: Sexuality and Adolescent Girls, 1993), changing the social constructions of masculinity and femininity will mean a fundamental shift in our conceptions of femininity and MASCULINITY within the context of dominant conceptions of rationality and morality

Femininity

Belphoebe
perfect maidenhood; epithet of Elizabeth I. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
Darnel, Aurelia
personification of femininity. [Br. Lit.: Sir Launcelot Greaves]
Miss America
winner of beauty contest; femininity high among virtues desired. [Am. Hist.: Payton, 445]
References in periodicals archive ?
Fully-funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the study consisted of semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 26 young women aged 18-25 who went on nights out with female friends in the city, exploring and discussing femininities in relation to appearance, drinking practices and risk management.
Whilst the NTE is increasingly recognised as a useful avenue through which to research young people's lives, less attention has been given to the girls' night out as a specific type of engagement with the NTE that may illuminate some of the nuances in the ways in which young women might "do" gender and femininities.
The only time I feel girly is when I go out": drinking stories, teenage girls, and respectable femininities.
Retaining a masculine ideal for bodies of flesh and knowledge and developing a commitment to relativising the state of (hegemonic) masculinity, gender studies has also given much more attention to masculinity than to femininities and far too often focused on femininity as a problem.
If we depart not (only) from Frye as she is reworked by Butler or Serrano but also from bell hooks definition where feminism is 'a movement to end sexist oppression (that) directs our attention to systems of domination and the inter-relatedness of sex, race, and class oppression'--in other words, to an understanding of sexism as always already entwined with other systems of domination, we can also approach the question of relations between femininities and femininity as a problem for feminism (Feminist Theory, p33).
These femininities are accomplished through culturally gendered practices in their respective workplaces.
These behaviors contrast markedly from those associated with women's femininities.
In tracing their discursive construction of femininities as articulated through the collective process of writing the central character and narratives for the video, we get a sense of the girls' individual identities, past histories and social locations.
Between Femininities makes a valuable contribution to our understanding of the lives and realities of girls and young women; their nuanced and complex navigations in a world which makes competing demands on them and which attempts to circumscribe them into particular gendered categories.
Emphasized femininity, on the other hand, is a kind of femininity that is in compliance with the prevailing pattern of femininity; which accommodates hegemonically masculine male interests and desires while preventing other femininities from gaining cultural articulation (Connell, 1987), an example of which would be iconic American television mothers of the 1960s and 1970s such as June Cleaver from "Leave it to Beaver," Carol Brady from the "Brady Bunch," or Mrs.
Femininities, like masculinities, are not passive parts of patriarchy.
When faced with only images of specific hegemonic femininities, it makes sense to resist by creating counter-representations, by placing different images in our mirrors, images that we might well want to reflect.