feminist theory


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Related to feminist theory: feminism, Queer theory

feminist theory

a theory (see also FEMINISM) which, with the political and social changes of the 1960s and 70s, has challenged traditional conceptions of femininity and GENDER. As Humm (1989) points out, feminist theory ‘both challenges, and is shaped by the academy and society’. It has been, above all, characteristic of the explosion of recent theories, including the work of Hélène CIXOUS, Kate Millet (1970), Juliet Mitchell (1974), Sheila Rowbotham (1973) and many more, that these theories ‘describe the historical, psychological, sexual, and racial experiences of women’, not just academically, but as an indication of ‘how feminism can be a source of power’. Because of this, tensions have existed between feminist theory and sociology, especially given that it has challenged the fact that much sociology has been a sociology of men, stating mens viewpoints. But feminist theory, in so far as it is not always in itself sociology, has contributed to an important reconstruction of sociological perspectives in many areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taking this site of "trouble" seriously (we might see an interesting idiomatic legacy to Judith Butler's foundational Gender Trouble here), Wilson's text takes biological data as its object not in order to either skeptically decry or optimistically champion it, but in order to use its insights to speak back to feminist theory as a field.
Gerhard unpacks the complex of issues that shaped the reception and meaning of The Dinner Party, including the changing direction of feminist theory away from an embrace of sexual difference and toward an understanding of gender, race, and sexuality as constructed through ideology; the art world's anxiety over the encroachment of popular culture into the realm of high art; and the growing market for feminist cultural commodities.
So much has been written in feminist theory that the nature and extent of this body of knowledge cannot be wholly represented in the present article.
Students in upper-level and graduate gender studies courses will find this text to be an invaluable tool for "doing" feminist theory and negotiating its ever-shifting paradigms.
Clare Hemmings's astute analysis of 'the stories that feminists tell about the past four decades of feminist theory' (dust-jacket) is a timely wake-up call for all those of us teaching and researching in the field of feminist theory and women's / gender studies.
Feminist Theory in Pursuit of the Public: Women and the Re-privatization of Labor.
Diana Wallace's " 'The Haunting Idea': Female Gothic Metaphors and Feminist Theory" contends that there is a close relationship between Gothic fiction and feminist theory and that the "complex interchange between the two" leads to a situation "where each enables the other" (36).
She relies on feminist theory and theories of colonial domination as well as on conclusions drawn from personal interviews with female activists.
In the final section, Carol Lazzaro-Weis explores the interrelationships of Italian feminist theory, the debates concerning women's history in the 1980s, and recent historical novels written by women.
Feminist theory, at the time often referred to as "continental" or "French Feminist Criticism," exposed contradictions that shot fault lines through the solidarity we identified with and needed so much.
This shift in the view of hormones may help resolve the long-standing difficulty in feminist theory that talks only about gender and the social and fails to address the existing physical and thus will aid in the formulation of feminist interventions into, for example, debates about the politics of hormonal medications such as the pill and hormone-replacement therapy.
There seems little consistency as to whether work on a particular individual which also deals with issues of feminist theory should be listed here or in the section on 'Individuals'.