feminist theory


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Related to feminist theory: feminism, Queer theory

feminist theory

a theory (see also FEMINISM) which, with the political and social changes of the 1960s and 70s, has challenged traditional conceptions of femininity and GENDER. As Humm (1989) points out, feminist theory ‘both challenges, and is shaped by the academy and society’. It has been, above all, characteristic of the explosion of recent theories, including the work of Hélène CIXOUS, Kate Millet (1970), Juliet Mitchell (1974), Sheila Rowbotham (1973) and many more, that these theories ‘describe the historical, psychological, sexual, and racial experiences of women’, not just academically, but as an indication of ‘how feminism can be a source of power’. Because of this, tensions have existed between feminist theory and sociology, especially given that it has challenged the fact that much sociology has been a sociology of men, stating mens viewpoints. But feminist theory, in so far as it is not always in itself sociology, has contributed to an important reconstruction of sociological perspectives in many areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because feminist theory identifies and supports the experiences, independence, and perspectives of women, the time is now for the reconfiguration of feminist theory to include the "dissident voices" (1996) of the heterosexual women who 'go against the grain' and the very fabric of what has contributed to the foundation of societies throughout history: conception, marriage and parenting.
A common taxonomy to describe the schools of feminist theory includes liberal, Marxist, social, radical, standpoint, and poststructural (Hesse-Biber, Gilmartin, & Lydenberg, 1999; McCann & Kim, 2003a).
See an earlier version of this chapter, " 'On the Threshold of Woman's Era': Lynching, Empire and Sexuality in Black Feminist Theory," in Critical Inquiry 12.
Grosz, then, attempts to dispel the resistance in feminist cultural theory to biology and to the body as matter, and she attempts to dismantle the natural/cultural opposition that she believes has stalled and circumscribed feminist theory.
In her short book, she covers philosophical methodology, sociology, cultural studies, feminist theory, medical ethics, and ethical theory.
Elaine Barkin and Lydia Hammessley, Audible Traces: Gender, Identity, and Music (1999), an essay which Pendle herself describes as concluding 'with some definitions and descriptions of feminist theory as it can apply to work in music', is listed here rather than in 'Feminist Theory'.
Although MacGregor rejects degendered notions of "care" and "nurture" as means to recreate social relations to nature, she otherwise stops short of setting forth a comprehensive feminist theory of ecological citizenship.
Many of the writers in this collection write from provocative standpoints drawing on film and feminist theory, psychoanalytic criticism, semiotics, and literary theory, providing useful ways of thinking about the issues, texts, and practices that circulate within youth cultures, indicating their underlying tensions and contradictions.
Temple University women's studies major Melody Berger enjoyed being the leader of teen workshops on feminist theory and lesbian issues at a "fabulous" performing arts camp for the past three summers.
Where critical theory may be understood as a critical analysis of social institutions in order to illuminate the structure of domination and oppression (Fay, 1987), feminist theory may be thought of as "an analysis of women's subordination for the purpose of figuring out how to change it" (Gordon, 1979, p.
After 15 years as a women's health activist, this year I began a PhD program that allows me to look at issues in feminist activism through the lens of feminist theory.
Although ethnocentric theory and research was criticized with the onset of modernity, in feminist circles the idea of a grand, global feminist theory has been perpetuated.