ferromagnetics

ferromagnetics

[¦fe·rō·mag¦ned·iks]
(electronics)
The science that deals with the storage of binary information and the logical control of pulse sequences through the utilization of the magnetic polarization properties of materials.
References in periodicals archive ?
Magnetic-pulse attraction and repulsion of thin-walled sheet ferromagnetics.
He covers conducting material systems and structures, dielectrics, piezoelectricity, ferromagnetics, and magnetostriction.
When scaled up similarly to ferromagnetics, that process can manifest on a computer as the writing or reading of digital information.
Button, Microwave ferrites and ferromagnetics, McGraw-Hill, NY (1962).
The foams can be formed from shape memory alloys, shape memory polymers, piezoelectric bimorphs, conductive polymers, ionic polymer gels, ferromagnetic shape memory alloys, ionic polymer metal composites, ferromagnetics, hard piezos, liquid crystal elastomers, or annealed polyacrylonitrile fibers.
The screens of conductive crystalline ferromagnetics are not working in considered area.
The domain structure of thick ferromagnetics forms as a result of the minimisation of the interaction energy, the energy of crystallographic anisotropy, magnetostatic and magnetostriction energies.
Deformation and Fracture of Functional Ferromagnetics.
Del Vecchio, "An efficient procedure for modeling complex hysteresis processes in ferromagnetics materials", IEEE trans, on Magnetics.
The machines are capable of handling both fine and coarse materials and have the ability to treat ferromagnetics and paramagnetics simultaneously.
For example, there's a technology called ferromagnetics that's important in the production of color television sets.
The materials involved include ferromagnetic, magnetic, dielectric, conductor and soldering.