few

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few

few
Few.
As it relates to cloud amounts, it means 1 or 2 octas of clouds (i.e., 1/8 or 2/8 of sky is covered with clouds).
References in periodicals archive ?
Nutritionist Frederick Stare of Harvard School of Public Health cautions that even if fewer calories paved the path to a long life, people might be hesitant to give up their pork chops and Twinkies.
Police logged about 7,000 fewer violent crimes so far this year than last in the city and 1,340 fewer in the Valley, statistics show.
2 million automobile insurance policies have been bought since 1995, though there are 780,000 fewer automobiles registered in the county today than there were then.
There are many reasons for the plunge in traffic, with fewer ships having passed through the canal in 1996 than at any time in the last two decades.
Women with low-risk pregnancies who choose midwives to deliver their babies have healthy births with fewer medical interventions than those who go either to obstetricians or family practice doctors, according to a new study of obstetric care.
Acute Care - Individuals enrolled in a CDHP showed an annual reduction in the use of acute care services (22 percent fewer hospital admissions and 14 percent fewer emergency room visits) without adverse health effects or outcomes, while the relative utilization of those services actually increased year-over-year among PPO members.
Because they generally have fewer credit options, smaller firms would seem more likely to borrow from owners than would larger firms; but in fact, the incidence of owner loans increased with firm size.
Every year, I see fewer request for nature leaders in the employment want-ads for camp personnel.
why he has one fewer home run than Mike Gallego this season.
Alexander will also focus on a recent Premier analysis of HQID, which suggests that, if all pneumonia, heart bypass, heart attack, and hip and knee replacement patients nationally received most or all of a set of widely accepted care processes in 2003, it could have resulted in nearly 5,652 fewer deaths; 6,000 fewer complications; 10,000 fewer readmissions; and 1 million fewer days in the hospital.
The report estimated that if the legal age were raised to 21 nationwide, there would be about 249,000 fewer premature deaths, 45,000 fewer lung cancer deaths and 4.