ficin


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ficin

[′fī·sən]
(organic chemistry)
A proteolytic enzyme obtained from fig latex or sap; hydrolyzes casein, meat, fibrin, and other proteinlike materials; used in the food industry and as a diagnostic aid in medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
7 which was lower than the commercial rennet, but higher than those of papain (367), ficin (393) and the crude enzyme produced by B.
67) Marguerite's interest in the subject is evident by the fact that in 1545 she commissioned Jean de la Haye (Symon Silvius) to translate Ficino's Commentarium; fittingly, the poet dedicated Le Commentaire de Marsile Ficin sur le Banquet d'Amour de Platon to her.
Thus proteolytic enzymes of plant origin such as papain, ficin and bromelain and acidic tenderizers such as acetic acid or vinegar, lactic acid and citric acids have been used to soften meat within a short time [14, 15].
Marsile Ficin et l'alchimie: sa position, son influence.
Anthony Grafton (Washington, DC-Vatican City: Yale UP, 1993): 125-67; Cesare Vasoli, "Le Debat sur l'astrologie a Florence dans la seconde moitie du XVeme siecle: Ficin, Pic de la Mirandole, Savonarole," Divinations et controverses religieuses en France au XVIeme siecle (Paris: Ecole Normale Superieure des Jeunes Filles, 1987): 19-33.
Enzybel's main business areas are the production of natural enzymes: papain, bromelain, ficin and actinidin; wastewater management; and snail extracts production
Ma la citazione proviene da Chastel: Marsile Ficin et l'art (57).
In this case, peptide bonds are broken into shorter chain units by means of proteolytic enzymes such as pepsin, papain, ficin and trypsin or by microbial proteases (Lusas and Riaz, 1995).
La Philosophie de l'amour de Marsile Ficin et son influence sur la litterature francaise au XVIe siecle.