fiction


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fiction:

see novelnovel,
in modern literary usage, a sustained work of prose fiction a volume or more in length. It is distinguished from the short story and the fictional sketch, which are necessarily brief.
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; short storyshort story,
brief prose fiction. The term covers a wide variety of narratives—from stories in which the main focus is on the course of events to studies of character, from the "short short" story to extended and complex narratives such as Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.
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fiction

1. literary works invented by the imagination, such as novels or short stories
2. Law something assumed to be true for the sake of convenience, though probably false
References in periodicals archive ?
Non fiction for toddlers and young children: * My Little Animals Book * The Farm * Big Noisy Trucks and Diggers * All Kinds of Feelings Non-fiction for infants * The Ice Bear * Diary of a Spider * The Magic School Bus * Inside the Human Body * Children's Cook Book Non-fiction for juniors * Pirate Diary: The Journal of Jake Carpenter * Just Joking * See Inside Famous Buildings * Horrible Histories * The Secret Life of Elizabeth I * Nature's Fury Non-fiction for teens * It's True
It does though raise the question about our feelings on Fiction and Non Fiction books.
Reading Science Fiction is no different in this regard.
Even from a first glance at the title of Warren Motte's text Fiction Now, many readers and critics may well pause before the elusive term now, for they may associate it with the difficulties inherent in attempting to pinpoint the current state of French fiction that remains in a continuous cycle of regeneration.
The first three chapters treat the same spans of history, emphasizing different decades and developments, and, though seemingly redundant, they also provide distinctly different perspectives and include notably unique details, so that the effect is of a cumulative appreciation of the struggles of the writers and editors who created the science fiction genre.
Not all science fiction has religious undertones, but there can be similarities between science fiction and religion.
Deriding the idea of fanfic as good training for writers, Hobb wrote, "Fan fiction allows the writer to pretend to be creating a story, while using someone else's world, characters, and plot.
Brigg draws the parameters of span fiction early in the book, asserting that "Science and its muscular sibling, technology, have transformed the world and the way human beings see it and behave in it:" As a consequence, both mainstream fiction and science fiction have seen their boundaries weakened; a number of mainstream fiction writers, Brigg says, "have now turned to explore strange horizons and find opportunities to express parts of their vision that realms new to them (but the stock-in-trade of the science fiction writer) will permit" (5).
The convention, hosted by the North Hollywood-based Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, highlights ``Exploring the Golden Ages of Science Fiction.
I'm a journalist by trade and a fiction writer by heart.
Feminist idolatry--an idol is anything put in importance over God and His Word--chronically communicates the misuse of artistic fiction.
He's one of the only effective social satirists writing fiction today," says Deborah Treisman, fiction editor of The New Yorker magazine, which has published at least one or two Saunders stories a year since the mid-1990s.