fiction

(redirected from fictionality)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

fiction:

see novelnovel,
in modern literary usage, a sustained work of prose fiction a volume or more in length. It is distinguished from the short story and the fictional sketch, which are necessarily brief.
..... Click the link for more information.
; short storyshort story,
brief prose fiction. The term covers a wide variety of narratives—from stories in which the main focus is on the course of events to studies of character, from the "short short" story to extended and complex narratives such as Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

fiction

1. literary works invented by the imagination, such as novels or short stories
2. Law something assumed to be true for the sake of convenience, though probably false
References in periodicals archive ?
Literariness, Fictionality, and the Theory of Possible Worlds.
In this monograph Richardson boldly challenges some distinguished theorists, such as Tzvetan Todorov, Gerald Genette, Vladimir Propp, David Herman, Gerald Prince, and James Phelan, just to name a few; he then creatively reimagines certain core narrative terms or concepts including narration, fabula and syuzhet, narrator, narrativity, character, space, sequence, consistency, fictionality, fictional minds, reader, and narrative beginnings and endings, etcetera from an unnatural perspective.
His argument that myth is not merely an Aristotelian mythos as radically different from logos, but is also transformed to a logos, posed the question: Can this transformation retain the fictionality of mythos?
Fictionality thus may be most accurately described as both ludic (partaking of that refusal to affirm inherent in Kantian disinterestedness), and also rhetorical, for it may, in some circumstances, dispose of the amoral power, in Nietzschean terms, to "create ethical codes [and] also discard them at will" (29).
The first two essays in the collection then situate fictionality in broad theoretical contexts.
The "novel" is a questionable genre to depict national "unity" if it is seen as essentially self-critical, and the self-conscious fictionality Hampton finds in certain texts hardly "resolves" tensions, as he claims, as it is inherently unstable and raises questions for the identity of its self and of the nation it supposedly reflects.
Austin's theory of performative speech acts, fictionality has been seen as a threat for as long as there have been critical debates about literature.
Far more than More and Plato, Joyce foregrounds fictionality, denying the reader a comfortable seat from which to follow any narrative continuity.
Megill offers four postulates: (1) the multiplicity postulate: "Never assume that there is a single authorized historical method or subject matter"; (2) the hybridization postulate: "Always establish residences outside the discipline," meaning that historians should cross boundaries to borrow insights from other disciplines but not eliminate those boundaries; (3) the fictionality postulate: "Always confront, in an explicit way, the fictionality implicit in all works of history," though he correctly notes that history/fiction dualism has limited analytical value and is prone to polemical abuse; (4) the theory postulate: "Always theorize," which is a way to awaken universal interest in a world that no longer believes in universal history (168-71).
She concludes that "Nick [Adams] brings reality and fictionality together and blurs traditional distinctions between fact and fiction by forcing the reader, who reads the book a fictional character wrote, to participate in his fictional world" (144).
Essential to the distinction between art and science is the element of fictionality always present in the work of art.
A more formal introduction that adds to the atmosphere of fictionality in this part of the play is Time's prologue.