fiction

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fiction:

see novelnovel,
in modern literary usage, a sustained work of prose fiction a volume or more in length. It is distinguished from the short story and the fictional sketch, which are necessarily brief.
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; short storyshort story,
brief prose fiction. The term covers a wide variety of narratives—from stories in which the main focus is on the course of events to studies of character, from the "short short" story to extended and complex narratives such as Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.
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fiction

1. literary works invented by the imagination, such as novels or short stories
2. Law something assumed to be true for the sake of convenience, though probably false
References in periodicals archive ?
The poor fictionist frequently finds himself to have been wrong in his description of things in general .
Charlotte Bronte inaugurated a new school of novels--the circumscribed--and some of our fictionists improve upon it, making books, which, in comparison with Walter Scott and Thackeray, remind one of the Chinese gardeners who make oak trees grow in small pots.
Indeed, it has become evident that these alternative channels of writings to have surfaced, boast a thematic range that is unrelated to the commanding matrix of those Hebrew fictionists who in the wake of Israeli statehood in the 1950s imposed their collective impulse on the national scene.
Moreover, say these alarmists, historians don't bother to confute the fictionists and most reviews let them get away with it.
Although some of the 164 entries on the 257 pages of CGCAAF are more intellectually satisfying than others, especially those on unknown or little known post-civil rights or "Post-Soul" generation fictionists such as Lolita Files, Alexs D.
Few fictionists, in situ or otherwise, have written on this area so relentlessly, compactly, and with such determined balance as McCabe.
If informative, this approach gives inadequate weight to how Greene's creative imagination molded his models and to the thematic implications he derived from his experiences; only Sherry's extracts from the writings indicate why Greene was one of the last century's foremost fictionists.
The editors point out that current fictionists such as Allegra Goodman, Allen Hoffman, and Daphne Merkin embrace Jewish culture and enthusiastically engage in dialogues with its history and orthodoxy.
Cook-Lynn, however, claims North American origins for fiction: "there were always fictionists among the Sioux, those persons who invented new tales and new characters out of the fabric of individual imagination and tribal experience" (50).
Rhymers kicking sordid tales from the drug wars were no longer journalists or fictionists, ironists or moralists.
Scottish Women's Fiction seems an odd title for a book that includes an essay on Rebecca West, and the sense that its editors had difficulty finding a sufficient number of female fictionists worthy of attention is confirmed by the fact that three authors (Nan Shepherd, Willa Muir, and Jessie Kesson) have two essays each devoted to them.
I do, however, respect many of his insights, and I most certainly agree with him that Hemingway, among the fictionists, most particularly reflected the failed quest of his age--to paraphrase Berman's paraphrase of Whitehead--to understand, justify, or accept the existence of pain and suffering in an allegedly orderly universe.