filter bubble

filter bubble

Customized results from search engines and social media that are geared to the individual based on that person's past preferences. A filter bubble means two people searching for the same thing receive a different sequence of results. Proponents say this delivers a better user experience, while opponents claim the information is always slanted and does not provide a sufficient variety of opinions.

Filter bubbles most assuredly have polarized America with regards to politics, as people's opinions are reinforced on a daily basis. It would seem there are very few social media platforms, radio stations or TV channels that report both sides of a story with equal intensity.


The Filter Bubble
Eli Pariser coined the term. In his 2011 book, he cited an earlier Google announcement that it would start using some 57 signals to determine the results it reports to users.
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It is very easy to get that filter bubble, you can develop an abusive out-group behaviour where lies are spread very easily about the people that you don't know.
At the exhibition, we see different incarnations of the filter bubble, which on closer inspection do not consist of anything other than endless variations and repetitions of their own basic elements.
And, OK, it probably is one giant (slightly self-congratula- tory) filter bubble occasionally.
The result would be to burst the social media filter bubble by rounding out our experience around news and current issues, introducing more variety into the information flow that feeds our intuition, judgment, decisions, and behavior.
Another key theme of our discussions over the two days were the challenges to the democratic debate posed by technological innovations that can result in the so-called filter bubble effect.
Mark Zuckerberg has since dismissed this notion as "pretty crazy" Maybe so, but my Hillary-voter filter bubble these days is becoming an echo chamber so deafening that I'm seriously re-examining how much time I spend on social media altogether.
No one's filter bubble is totally pure, but is influenced by that person's social networks, beliefs, worldview, and the like.
On top of that, your filter bubble (more on this later) is rarely "pure," and it's influenced by your own social networks, search behaviors, beliefs, background, education, and worldview.
It takes time and focus to identify the key intersections of clients' information needs, online resources, and search strategies, but the result is a filter bubble that works.
Ixquick uses SSL encryption so hackers and government sources cannot eavesdrop, and it does not use a filter bubble to prescreen results provided to you.
This adaptation is known as filter bubble (Pariser, 2011): the filtering of results according to the customs and opinions of the user reinforces those opinions, offering the user a personalized perspective of the world, specially designed to suit the user's likes.