fin efficiency

fin efficiency

[′fin ə‚fish·ən·sē]
(engineering)
In extended-surface heat-exchange equations, the ratio of the mean temperature difference from surface-to-fluid divided by the temperature difference from fin-to-fluid at the base or root of the fin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fin efficiency theory is adopted to calculate the fin effective area:
The fin efficiency is the ratio of the heat flow through the fin to that flowing through the fin if the entire fin surface is at the fin (root) temperature.
During the solution, the fin efficiency was determined using modified equations for plane fins, as suggested by Wang et al 2000.
However, the increase in heat flux through the fin surfaces has the effect of decreasing fin efficiency and overall surface effectiveness due to an increase in the fin surface temperature gradient.
The fin efficiency of a heat sink measures the amount of heat that is conducted from the base to the top of the fins.
Each of these models uses fin efficiency to simplify calculation of steady-state heat and mass transfer for the air side.
A typical aluminum refrigerator evaporator's fin efficiency is 95%, whereas the copper evaporator design has a fin efficiency of 67%.
2007) also presented an improved method for characterizing fin efficiency for heat transfer when condensation occurs that is incorporated into the modeling approaches described in the current paper.
Using diamond, it is possible to attain high fin efficiency for heat sinks.
Here, fin efficiency is calculated from the method proposed by Schmidt (1945) and McQuiston and Parker (1982).
Kondepudi and O'Neal (1990) comprehensively discussed the effects of frost on fin efficiency, overall heat transfer coefficient, pressure drop, and surface roughness of extended surface heat exchangers.