fin efficiency

fin efficiency

[′fin ə‚fish·ən·sē]
(engineering)
In extended-surface heat-exchange equations, the ratio of the mean temperature difference from surface-to-fluid divided by the temperature difference from fin-to-fluid at the base or root of the fin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The demonstrator form factor, which includes integral planar fins and heat pipe technology, achieved virtually 100 percent fin efficiency.
The fin efficiency of a heat sink measures the amount of heat that is conducted from the base to the top of the fins.
During the solution, the fin efficiency was determined using modified equations for plane fins, as suggested by Wang et al.
A typical aluminum refrigerator evaporator's fin efficiency is 95%, whereas the copper evaporator design has a fin efficiency of 67%.
Each of these models uses fin efficiency to simplify calculation of steady-state heat and mass transfer for the air side.
All of the existing cooling coil models that employ the fin efficiency concept utilize relationships developed for dry fins (i.
Using diamond, it is possible to attain high fin efficiency for heat sinks.
2007) also presented an improved method for characterizing fin efficiency for heat transfer when condensation occurs that is incorporated into the modeling approaches described in the current paper.
The local distribution of temperatures within the fin material is handled through use of an overall fin efficiency so that local coil temperature, [T.
Here, fin efficiency is calculated from the method proposed by Schmidt (1945) and McQuiston and Parker (1982).
Fin efficiency obtained from the model is about 80%, and the air-side heat transfer correlation according to air velocity change is expressed as shown in Equation 6 and Figure 5.
In some cases, this could have reduced the fin efficiency due to the reduced width at the base of the fin.