fin spine

fin spine

[′fin ‚spīn]
(vertebrate zoology)
A bony process that supports the fins of certain fishes.
References in periodicals archive ?
using fin spine cross-sections: the need for an international code of practice.
Lengths of each fin spine, ray and dorsal fin height are taken from the base of each element.
Age studies using cross sections of the first dorsal fin spine (n = 1074 individuals), verified that vascularization in the inner portion of the spine does not interfere with age determination.
For example, Maraldo and MacCrimmon (15) found that dorsal fin spine and pectoral fin ray cross sections were unreliable for aging largemouth bass from northern waters.
Deep body, somewhat compressed laterally, greatest depth at a line just anterior to the base of first dorsal fin spine; well-developed eye; small mouth; body surface covered by small plates, wrinkled to the touch; dorsal fin origin in a position posterior to the gill opening and in the same direction as the superior base of pectoral fin; dorsal fin spines decreasing in size from first to last; pelvic fins spines surpassing a vertical line which passes by the origin of anal fin (except in the specimen LIUEFS 4820 where the spines are broken); spines of dorsal and pelvic fins with denticles; first spine of dorsal fin in the same direction of the base of spine of pelvic fins.
In addition, acanthodian fish scales and a portion of a fin spine, and numerous actinopterygian and sarcopterygian fish scales and tips of actinopterygian teeth from the MNSC were identified by Kenaga and Sellepack (1995).
Catfish stridulation sounds are produced by microscopic bony ridges located on the distal end of the pectoral fin spine that are rubbed against the wall of the spinal fossa (3).
Their malevolent reputation is understandable if you've been stuck by a dorsal or pectoral fin spine.
Part of a large chondrichthyan fin spine from Middle Pennsylvanian deposits of Illinois was described and named Xystracanthus mirabilis by St.
A well-preserved dorsal fin spine of the extinct chimaeroid genus Edaphodon Buckland 1838, was recovered from the upper Olcese Sand (late Early Miocene) of California, and is the geochronologically youngest reported occurrence of Edaphodon from the fossil record of North America.