findspot

findspot

[′fīnd‚spät]
(archeology)
The place where an archeological object has been found.
References in periodicals archive ?
The excavated material is organized into type of figurine, findspot, and material, with detailed discussion of ceramic production.
Third, La Quina is the findspot of more than 35 Neanderthal individuals, including an adult skeleton and the cranium of a child.
Dividing them into five main groups according to technical differences, she takes a commendably conservative approach to the reconstructions, which are based on a combination of technical features, precise archaeological findspot, and motival joins.
Each entry includes a bibliography, a summary of the record made during the clearing of the tomb, a summary of Segal's dossier, measurements, description of the findspot, conservation measures carried out at the time of clearance, description of the structure and decoration, translation and discussion of any associated texts, and discussion of the object.
3), which uses the findspot, a linguistic/orthographic classifier (P = Punic; NP = Neo-Punic; LP = Latino-Punic; G = Greek; L = Latin), and a sequence number.
Part of the British Museum Research Publication series (formerly titled British Museum Occasional Papers), this book's aim is to provide a catalogue, description, and identification of all the bucchero in the British Museum; each piece is published with its title, regulation and catalogue numbers, measurements, findspot, production place, acquisition, date, notes, detailed physical and critical descriptions, and notes on its color as each is published with a black-and-white image.
Although the alleged findspot of the bronze, off the Tunisian coast at the site of the late Hellenistic Mahdia shipwreck, has never been given much consideration, it provides an interesting, if unprovable, scenario for the statuette as part of a cargo of Greek works of art likely intended for the art market in Rome, or elsewhere in Italy.
There seems to be no evidence about the exact findspot of this text, but it is certain that it comes from the Khotan region; (2) moreover, according to Yutaka Yoshida's recent reading, Khotan is even mentioned in the text.
a) The rough percentage of cropped land in each grid square exhibits a substantial positive correlation with findspot intensities (C1 in Figure 1b).
The catalogue records all that can be said about the findspot of each object, noting times of recovery and associations that may be significant, without uncritical acceptance of the testimony of dealers.
For most of them, the specific findspot seems not to have been noted by Schmitt, but rather only the general 10x10 m excavation square.
Failing stratigraphy, it may simply be other, comparable finds; or the findspot, if only vaguely defined, as with many Victorian discoveries.