findspot

findspot

[′fīnd‚spät]
(archeology)
The place where an archeological object has been found.
References in periodicals archive ?
An initial investigation of the findspot by the National Museum turned into an important research excavation and community archaeology project.
The PAS scheme is a voluntary reporting system for archaeological objects under which members of the public are encouraged to bring chance finds in for identification and for logging of the findspot.
She advocates the full and consistent itemization of both findspot data and ownership history of all works discussed along with the name, date, material, and present whereabouts that are already always itemized; the foregrounding of artworks about which scholars have more contextual data over objects about which they have little or none; and an increased attention to the modern reception history of canonical but archaeologically undocumented objects.
The excavated material is organized into type of figurine, findspot, and material, with detailed discussion of ceramic production.
Ridley, "The Finding of the Esquiline Silver Treasure: An Unpublished Letter," Antiquaries Journal 76 (1996): 215-22, confirmed Shelton's identification of the treasure's findspot.
97) The findspot was at the north edge of a dense artifact scatter east of the modern village of Examilia.
Lawrence Island have been an abundant source of old ivory and the main findspot of the rare Okvik figurines now coveted so highly on the art market.
It is named after its findspot, where it was put to use in the binding of a book.
Seen from this perspective it matters little whether the object's original findspot is known or not.
Each entry includes a bibliography, a summary of the record made during the clearing of the tomb, a summary of Segal's dossier, measurements, description of the findspot, conservation measures carried out at the time of clearance, description of the structure and decoration, translation and discussion of any associated texts, and discussion of the object.
The cornucopia, together with the findspot (see below), confirms the identification as Acheloos.
But of much greater yield are the ubiquitous 19th century domestic site, the prehistoric lithic scatter of unknown cultural affiliation, and the isolated findspot, all site types that have generally received little previous attention by researchers.