fingerboard


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fingerboard

the long strip of hard wood on a violin, guitar, or related stringed instrument upon which the strings are stopped by the fingers
References in periodicals archive ?
Andy believed that this approach would improve muscle memory of the location of notes on the fingerboard and enables the student to organise the left hand better.
The D Mahogany features mahogany neck, back and sides, an alpine spruce soundboard and katalox fingerboard and bridge.
Nevertheless, intensity can be prescribed as a percentage of the generated maximal force during special preparatory strength exercises on a fingerboard because for each hold or lath the maximal force can be calculated (i.
The action is high at the far reaches of the fingerboard and this makes the playing of some pieces difficult.
2" fingerboard design that eliminates excess FR4 board.
Ruth Stap (1944 to 1948) had a similar job: cutting out and installing the pearl Gibson logo and fingerboard inlays.
the neck is perfect, the fingerboard is slightly upright, elevated and longer .
Despite Palmer's feigned distrait, adept performance of slithering fingerboard runs and inharmonic push-pull pizzicatos, and Party officials' claim that Prokofiev's music was proscriptively "formal" (rather than, say, melodic/narrative--the musical equivalent of Abstract Expressionism), Sonata No.
The Sarod is a fretless stringed instrument with a teak frame, a goatskin soundtable, and a metal fingerboard with six to eight strings plus several sympathetic strings adding up to anywhere from 19 to 25 total.
According to the settlement, "The Government and Gibson acknowledge and agree that certain questions and inconsistencies now exist regarding the tariff classification" of the ebony and rosewood fingerboard "blanks" that were confiscated.
His technical knowledge of how the fingerboard relates to various temperaments and tuning, as well as his understanding of string action, are very useful when considering how extant instruments may have been altered over time.
The sonorities of his two fine instruments (the sixth Suite is written for a five-string cello piccolo) display a whole range of colours to underline this common coinage, yet at the same time the close, atmospheric recording set down in St George's Church, Chesterton, Cambridge reminds us that no music could be more intimate than this --even to the extent of hearing the soloist's fingers negotiating the fingerboard.