fingerprint


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fingerprint,

an impression of the underside of the end of a finger or thumb, used for identification because the arrangement of ridges in any fingerprint is thought to be unique and permanent with each person (no two persons having the same prints have ever been found). Palm prints and footprints are also used, especially for identification of infants. Traditionally, impressions have been taken from a person using ink and paper, but in live-scan fingerprinting electronic images produced by a video scanner are converted by computer into binary codes, which can be more readily compared.

As an identification device, fingerprinting dates from antiquity, but modern systems began essentially with the work of Henry Faulds, William James Herschel, and Sir Francis Galton in the late 19th cent. Fingerprints gained acceptance as a more objective form of identification than visual recognition. The Galton method, elaborated by E. R. Henry, is still used in Great Britain and the United States. Juan Vucetich in Argentina, also using Galton as a guide, developed (1904) an alternate system that gained wide acceptance in Spanish-speaking countries.

Fingerprinting for identification of criminals was first used in connection with the Bertillon systemBertillon system
, first scientific method of criminal identification, developed by the French criminologist Alphonse Bertillon (1853–1914). The system, based on the classification of skeletal and other body measurements and characteristics, was officially adopted in
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. Most countries now require that all criminals be fingerprinted. Methods have also been devised for developing fingerprint impressions left by criminals at the scene of a crime. The most common uses a brush and powder to mark the fingerprint, which is then photographed and lifted from the surface using tape. The reliability of fingerprints for criminal identification is complicated by the need to use crime scene prints that may be partial or distorted and by the technical competency of the person identifying the print (computer identification is often used as an aid).

In 2002 a federal judge ruled that, because of inconsistencies in laboratory identification of fingerprints, fingerprint identification as practiced was not accurate enough to be used without qualification, and that an expert cannot testify that a person's fingerprints absolutely match those found at a crime, though an expert may point out similarity between two sets of prints and may state that no two people have identical prints. The judge reversed himself two months later, deciding that although the FBI's fingerprint identification procedures were not proven scientifically according to a strict standard they were nonetheless sufficiently reliable.

In the United States, prints also are taken of civilian government employees and members of the armed forces and by some banks and other agencies. Some states now require a thumbprint when applying for a driver's license, and banks and check-cashing institutions are increasingly requiring a thumbprint before cashing checks, particularly in states that use license thumbprints. Some stores also require thumbprints when paying by check or even by credit card. A national fingerprint file and database is maintained by the Federal Bureau of InvestigationFederal Bureau of Investigation
(FBI), division of the U.S. Dept. of Justice charged with investigating all violations of federal laws except those assigned to some other federal agency.
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.

Bibliography

See C. Beavan, Fingerprints (2001), and S. A. Cole, Suspect Identities (2001). Technical works on the subject include H. C. Lee and R. E. Gaensslen, ed., Advances in Fingerprint Technology (2d ed., 2001), D. R. Ashbaugh, Quantitative-Qualitative Friction Ridge Analysis (1999), and D. L. Faigman et al., Modern Scientific Evidence (2d ed., 2002).

fingerprint

[′fiŋ·gər‚print]
(analytical chemistry)
Evidence for the presence or the identity of a substance that is obtained by techniques such as spectroscopy, chromatography, or electrophoresis.
(forensic science)
A pattern of distinctive epidermal ridges on the bulbs of the inside of the end joints of fingers and thumbs.
An impression of a human fingerprint.

fingerprint

1. an impression of the pattern of ridges on the palmar surface of the end joint of each finger and thumb
2. Biochem the pattern of fragments obtained when a protein is digested by a proteolytic enzyme, usually observed following two-dimensional separation by chromatography and electrophoresis

fingerprint

A physical or electronic pattern. See fingerprint reader, acoustic fingerprint, virtual fingerprint, video fingerprint and signature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Privacy issues emerge when a government agency does something with a person's fingerprint that goes beyond the original purpose for its collection.
Most years a new category of people to be fingerprinted is added,'' said Gary Maggy, chief of the bureau of criminal identification and information at the California Department of Justice, where roughly 651,000 fingerprints were submitted last year.
The reference design includes a field-proven integrated UPEK enrollment tutorial that makes fingerprint authentication simple to use for first time users.
The 8,245 isolates with more than six copies of IS6110 yielded 5,640 fingerprint patterns.
Fabiani said the report vindicated the White House because the FBI did not find fingerprints from any of the Clinton aides Republicans have suggested might have spirited the records out of Foster's office after his death.
If so, fingerprint cards then can be submitted to State repositories to verify the subject's identity.
These preliminary results demonstrate that DNA fingerprints are capable of changing completely the emphasis of blood-grouping [biochemical identifications] in forensic science," say Gill, Jeffreys and Werrett.
Cogent is a leading provider of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems, or AFIS, and other fingerprint biometric solutions to governments, law enforcement agencies and other organizations worldwide.
Teach participants to fingerprint mothers and to include the print on the infant's print card
Today, computers play an important role in storing fingerprint records.
To get a high-quality fingerprint, would you use a fine or coarse powder?
Consequently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded six laboratories in 1993 to develop regional databases of DNA genotype fingerprint patterns and undertake regional molecular epidemiologic studies.