fission bomb


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Related to fission bomb: fusion bomb

fission bomb

[′fish·ən ‚bäm]
(ordnance)
References in periodicals archive ?
Plutonium-239 can also be used in fission bombs and is produced in nuclear power reactors from natural uranium.
Strangely, Compton's story omitted any reference to the H-bomb as such, and of the fact that it had threatened to distract the seminar from its primary purpose: working out the physics of the fission bomb.
Former scientific advisor to the Prime Minister Ashok Parthasarthy, who was also present at the press conference, said: " In 1974, when it was a fission bomb of much less yield, there was a large crater.
There, technicians trained in handling nuclear materials would add the tritium or deuterium composites that turn a plain old fission bomb into a massive thermonuclear fusion bomb.
It has been almost 60 years since the United States, having learned that Nazi Germany was working on a devastating fission bomb, rushed to by the first nation to develop the technology to split the atom, and use it as a weapon of mass destruction.
To quote Rhodes again: "The theoretical complexity of what came to be known as the Super challenged Teller as the fission bomb had not.
Even then Teller was fixated on building a hydrogen bomb and would not do the work of the laboratory that Oppenheimer was directing, which was trying to build a fission bomb.
He was also elected chairman of the General Advisory Committee (GAC) of the Atomic Energy Commission, where a major debate raged over building the so-called Super Bomb, later known as the hydrogen bomb, a weapon based on nuclear fusion that would be far more powerful than the fission bomb.
It would be a thousand times more powerful than the fission bomb.
Teller's interest in the possibility of a fusion bomb was first piqued by Enrico Fermi, who suggested, in the fall of 1941 that the heat from a fission bomb might produce a fusion reaction in deuterium.
This utilised X-Rays from a fission bomb to detonate a deuterium-tritium mixture derived from lithium-6 deuteride.
Szilard shared with Klein not only the story of his own cancer, but also his greatest tragedy: the burden of his decision to make the United States the only possessor of the fission bomb, a decision he desperately tried to reverse when the danger of the Nazis possessing it ended.