fixed-wing aircraft


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fixed-wing aircraft

An airplane or glider whose wing is rigidly attached to the structure, or is other-wise adjustable. The term is used to refer to monoplanes, biplanes, triplanes, and, in fact, all conventional aircraft that are neither balloons, airships, autogyros, helicopters or tilt-rotors. The term embraces a minority of aircraft that have folding wings, which are intended to fold when on the ground, such as those used in aircraft carriers. It also includes aircraft with variable geometry wings (i.e., those that can be swept back to varying degrees in flight). The term usually differentiates rotary-wing aircraft (helicopters and autogyros) from normal aircraft. It should not be confused with the hard wings used in air-refueling aircraft.
References in periodicals archive ?
The guidance states that fixed-wing aircraft "should not" fly through the Llanberis Pass, rather than "shall not".
Ground effect definitely exists when flying a fixed-wing aircraft close to water.
Scientists found that, faced with windy conditions, Cossack collapsed his wings in response to strong gusts instead of holding them out stiffly like a fixed-wing aircraft.
This SWOT analysis of Military Fixed-Wing Aircraft market is a crucial resource for industry executives and anyone looking to gain a better understanding of the market.
Harrison Ford owns and flies both fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters.
Such shifts, absent among conventional fixed-wing aircraft, could make the plane spin or become otherwise unmanageable, says Daniel J.
Currently the service, which provides surveillance and support to the Cleveland, Durham and Northumbria police forces, operates with one helicopter and one fixed-wing aircraft.
Since 1965 the navy's air assets had been limited to helicopters because the president decided that fixed-wing aircraft were the exclusive territory of the air force.
Pilots earn their wings to fly jets, helicopters, propeller craft and other fixed-wing aircraft.
The murderous response to the Shi'ite uprisings was fine-tuned: the White House allowed Hussein free rein in southern Iraq, drawing the line at his use of chemical weapons and fixed-wing aircraft.
The total air ``package'' within Operation Telic is made up of around 100 fixed-wing aircraft, 27 support helicopters and more than 8,000 personnel.
5 million gallons of herbicide in Southeast Asia, mostly from fixed-wing aircraft.