fixed

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fixed

1. (of an element) held in chemical combination
2. (of a substance) nonvolatile
3. Astrology of, relating to, or belonging to the group consisting of the four signs of the zodiac Taurus, Leo, Scorpio, and Aquarius, which are associated with stability
References in periodicals archive ?
Other significant characteristics, according to the author, are identified by their high frequency in use and co-occurrence of their constituent elements; by the sense of fixedness as well as semantics specialization; by their idiomaticity and the degree of manifestation of all these aspects.
We are now in a different set, where the drawing ceases to refer to the simple game of offering a crude representation of a familiar animal, but where this visual puzzle draws us into questions about both the rigidity of our vision (not just in the purely mechanical sense), the fixedness of some of our interpretations of the world, but also our ability to bring new interpretations to bear on our world.
165-166, our translation) and phraseologysts agree that the criteria of fixedness is random.
Turning back the reader to revisit the past, the lines hover over historical fact, using insinuation to rarefy the fixedness of the LA riots.
Faten transcends cultural and religious boundaries articulating a hybrid identity that resists fixedness, stability, patriarchy, and thus expresses a new mobile, unstable and liberal subjectivity that responds to the calls of "modernity" in twenty-first century Morocco.
Thus, race gives to social relations the veneer of fixedness, of long duration, and invokes, even silently, the tendency to characterize assent relations in the language of descent.
While they challenge the permanence or fixedness of particular rules, they also reveal that the methods and processes by which those rules are determined are secure and organized.
Earlier catalogues, even in their playful and humorous manifestations, still assumed the fixedness and clear identification of the items that were enumerated, often coupled with claims of quasi-universal validity.
This theoretical approach to identity acknowledges both biological and social components, as well as qualities of fixedness and discreteness across groups.
Moreover, we argue that this lack of fixedness is useful for indigeneity as a tool to be used for justice for Indigenous peoples.
Spinelli (2013) and Rubin (1984) allude to this imminence in discussions of the popular cultural belief in sexual rigidity and fixedness.