flaneur


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flaneur

a stroller, watcher, observer. The concept has poetic origins in the work of Charles Baudelaire (e.g. Art in Paris, 1845-62). He used it to encapsulate the new, metropolitan character type of the 1840s: the man in the urban crowd, the man whose outlook is shaped by the mobile gallery of metropolitan existence. The most notable sociological application of the concept is to be found in the work of Walter BENJAMIN (1983). In his Arcades project he presents the city as a labyrinth or a multi-layered social universe. Benjamin plays on the ambiguity of the concept to convey the sense of a stroller-watcher of urban forms as well as a detective or unscrambler of codes. The concept has been criticized by feminists for marginalizing womens distinctive urban experience. Wolff (1985) attempts to retrieve this experience with the concept of the flaneuse, or ‘the woman in the crowd’. Recent work on postmodernism, urban sociology and the sociology of consumption has used the concept offlanerie to refer to looking, observing (social types, configurations and urban milieux), decoding the hieroglyphics of the city (spatial images, architecture, advertising and the general ‘sign economy’) and reading texts and images about the city.
References in periodicals archive ?
Esa indefension descrita tambien se relaciona con la idealizacion del flaneur, el errabundo que va sin destino manifiesto de un ligar a otro; capaz de afrontar toda suerte de imponderables que, naturalmente, pueden ser fatidicos.
The flaneur actually is a male bourgeois, who freely moves in the city joining in this way the "endless parade of strangers", the domain constituting the public space with fundamental characteristics of a domestic interieur.
En esta obra se cuaja un importante rasgo de la poetica del autor: el estupor visual y la caricia verbal frente a las perlas en bruto que los lugares menos concurridos o invisibilizados--por "populares" o marginales--de Santiago ofrecen a la mirada del poeta que recorre la ciudad, como un flaneur de finales del siglo XX.
Gliding onwards, plunging his hands into the pockets of his billowing overcoat, the flaneur thinks of his forebear Baudelaire, that cursed madman of early modernity.
Primeiro com o fisiologista parisiense, que daria lugar ao flaneur, cujo apogeu encontrou em Baudelaire sua maxima expressao.
And, French being a gendered language, the flaneur is always male.
While the original flaneur did not participate in acts of consumption, Rubbino's child and adult characters are involved constantly in consumer behaviours as they purchase entrance tickets to various landmarks, consume local delicacies, buy mementoes, and so forth.
MY SECOND TRIP to Paris led to my thinking of myself as a flaneur of sorts-that uniquely Parisian figure, thanks to Baudelaire, who found meaning in wandering the city's streets for "refuge in the crowd," in Benjamin's words.
The astringent, erotic masterpiece by Tokyo's great nostalgic flaneur.
Pour illustrer ses propos, l'orateur a evoque Baudelaire, assimilant le journaliste a un flaneur qui doit etre, a la fois, passif et actif.
KOLKATA HAS MUCH TO OFFER any traveler, whether history buff, literary aficionado, culture seeker, or wandering flaneur.
Aptly, the reader's journey begins with a chapter introducing the concept of the flaneur, a curious urban-dweller who explores the city in search of interesting sights and sounds.