flicker effect

flicker effect

[′flik·ər i‚fekt]
(electronics)
Random variations in the output current of an electron tube having an oxide-coated cathode, due to random changes in cathode emission.

Flicker Effect

 

slow fluctuations of the electric currents and voltages in vacuum-tube and gas-filled electronic devices. Such fluctuations are caused by the vaporization of atoms of the cathode material, the diffusion of atoms from deep layers of the cathode to its surface, the bombardment of the cathode with positive ions, and structural changes in the cathode. The bombardment of the cathode with positive ions results in ion implantation and the formation of a layer of foreign atoms on the cathode’s surface. A space charge partially suppresses the flicker effect.

flicker effect

Nausea, dizziness, or vertigo that can be brought on by flickering at certain frequencies of a bright light source, such as sunlight or a strobe, when viewed through a rotating propeller or rotor blades.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some researchers have stated flicker effect and harmonics to be in direct relation with each other [26], [27].
There is going to be a flicker effect on our house and the drone noise will affect us.
Seance (1959), for example, provides one of the first cinematic examples of a flicker effect, predating the work of both Peter Kubelka and Tony Conrad.
Overhead, a giant industrial fan slowly whirled, producing a slight flicker effect.
The yellow and purple contrast colours and asymmetrical design create a flicker effect when travelling through the air to make this the most visible ball in football.
The whole flicker effect has come a long way in the last decade.
Images on a CRT, on the other hand, need to be refreshed repeatedly, which produces the flicker effect.
The flameless candles are made with advanced LED technology to provide a natural flicker effect, and a convenient four-hour timer can be set to turn the candle on at the same time each day.
Using this way of control, the flicker effect is observed, the severity of which depends on short-circuit ratio of the supply network in the point of connection.
Other problems that have cropped up with wind power include angry abutters, who often object to a huge monopole being built near their homes; and the flicker effect, when sunlight, bouncing off those spinning turbine blades, creates a light-shadow-light pattern that can bother neighbors at certain times of day.
Presented with a flicker effect, the video was intended to produce afterimages on the retina--another kind of ghost, and an ephemeral correlative to the shadows formed on the wall by the theatrical lights and the screens--but its brevity and tiny projection size rendered it less than effectual.