flight visibility


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flight visibility

[′flīt ‚viz·ə‚bil·əd·ē]
(meteorology)
Average visibility in a forward direction from an aircraft in flight.

flight visibility

The visibility forward from the cockpit of an aircraft in flight (ICAO). It is the average horizontal distance at which prominent unlighted objects can be seen and identified by day and prominent lighted objects can be seen and identified at night.
References in periodicals archive ?
The contact approach allows pilots operating IFR, clear of clouds and with at least one mile of flight visibility to proceed to the destination airport in those conditions.
175, which states that a pilot cannot land if "the flight visibility is less than the visibility prescribed in the standard instrument approach procedure being used.
We'd gently suggest if you can see the far end of a 3000-foot the runway from short final, the flight visibility is at least a mile and, as long as they remain clear of clouds, there definitely can be someone else out there.
The regulations require the requisite flight visibility in order to land, and that might be better than reported visibility.
First, we'll need to be operating clear of clouds with one-mile flight visibility--you forfeit your authorization to punch through clouds and you must have and maintain one mile of flight visibility all the way to landing.
You say the correct answer involves flight visibility as determined by the pilot and I understand that point for making an approach.
According to the NTSB, a Civil Air Patrol pilot who searched for the missing aircraft opined the flight visibility in the accident site area would have been very bad at night.
Point is, the flight visibility as determined from the cockpit is the winner.
The requirements to land following an approach are the same for both Part 91 and Part 135: All you need is one of the standard visual references and the required flight visibility specified on the approach plate, meaning the visibility from the cockpit in flight.
Controlling visibility is not ground visibility, as reflected by the RVR values, but rather flight visibility as measured from the cockpit of the aircraft.
For those pilots authorized to take a look, that is, to descend to the MDA or DH/DA when the weather is below published minimums, the regulations for all operators become identical at the MDA or DH/DA: the approach may not be continued for a landing unless both the minimum flight visibility prescribed for the approach exists and the pilot can clearly see one or more of the items delineated in 91.

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