flinch


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flinch

a card game in which players build sequences
References in periodicals archive ?
A real all-out, no holds barred flinch can be a wondrous thing to behold.
With Montgomery Flinch himself starring, the film is bound to be a hit, although Gold's behaviour as a director is increasingly suspicious: why has he made so many seemingly minor changes to the script?
And if you spent a week or so convincing yourself of the possibility that Flinch might--just might--talk himself into endorsing Pride The Mountain.
In response to the article 'Will he flinch or fight?
Summary: The Chancellor insists the Government will not flinch from the "hard choices on public spending" after the country emerges from recession.
In a speech on Government plans to "reprioritise" spending, Mr Darling will say he "won't flinch from difficult decisions".
Battered by business interests, jumped upon by enthusiasts, and blamed for everything that goes wrong, web engineers have enough to flinch about without having to cope with slipshod design and dumpy deliverables.
Nor do you have to be gay to be made queasy by homophobia, Muslim to flinch at "towel-head"-type epithets, female to be sickened by sexism, or black to speak out against racism.
Ewing, a second-year guard, played the rest of the quarter and didn't flinch, The Clippers trailed by as many as seven points in the first quarter but closed the quarter with an 8-0 run and took the lead.
The ultrasonic tones it emitted, undetectable to the human ear, often caused dogs to flinch and howl.
He says there are two questions that tend to make managers flinch when he is asked to consult with an organization on employee motivation and customer satisfaction.