Flirtatiousness


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Related to Flirtatiousness: contempt, coquettish

Flirtatiousness

See also Seduction.
Boop, Betty
comic strip character who flirts to win over boys. [Comics: Horn, 110]
can-can
boisterous and indecorous French dance designed to arouse audiences. [Fr. Hist.: Scholes, 151]
Célimène
unabashed coquette wooed by Alceste. [Fr. Lit.: The Misanthrope]
Columbine
light-hearted, flirtatious girl. [Ital. Lit.: Walsh Classical, 83]
dandelion
traditional symbol of flirtation. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 413]
daylily
traditional symbol of flirtation. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
fan
symbol of coquetry. [Folklore: Jobes, 370]
Frasquita
woman character chiefly remembered for her flirtatiousness toward old Don Eugenio. [Ger. Opera: Wolf, The Magistrate, Westerman, 262]
Habanera
Carmen’s “love is a wild bird” provokes hearers. [Fr. Opera: Bizet, Carmen, Westerman, 189–190]
Jiménez, Pepita
young widow coquettishly distracts seminarian; love unfolds. [Span. Lit.: Pepita Jiménez]
Julie, Miss
young gentlewoman high-handedly engages servant’s love. [Swed. Lit.: Miss Julie in Plays by August Strindberg]
Musetta
leads on Alcindoro while pursuing Marcello. [Ital. Opera: Puccini, La Bohème, Westerman, 349]
O’Hara
Scarlett hot-tempered heroine-coquette who wooed Southern Gentlemen. [Am. Lit.: Gone With The Wind]
Varden, Dolly
Watteau-style colorful costume: broad-brimmed hat and dress with deep cleavage; honors Dickens character. [Br. Costume: Misc.; Br. Lit.: Barnaby Rudge, Espy, 272]
West, Mae
(1892–1980) actress personified as a vamp; known for her famous line, “Come up and see me some time.” [Am. Cinema: Halliwell, 759]
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, it is in the fluidity and the interstices of gender and sexual identities that the flirtatiousness and playfulness of the courtesan milieu emerges, and it is in Bombay film songs, not narratives, that Eros is most powerfully expressed.
For these young people, the act did not promote the refined flirtatiousness which came to predominate in musical comedies.
51) Both roles permitted privileged women a degree of influence in public affairs, a theme also addressed in Gertrude Jenning's one-act suffrage play, A Woman's Influence, in which men who are more susceptible to feminine flattery and flirtatiousness than to reason are the objects of ridicule.
Joan Riviere's argument about masquerade centres upon a case study of a female academic in the 1920s whose 'theft' of the masculine prerogative to speak confidently in public is masked by her feminine performance of approval-seeking flirtatiousness after her lectures.
It hasn't worn out its welcome just yet, and some of the shows that have been emerging from the fad - with their mixture of flirtatiousness, artistry and flat-out comedy - have been a lot of fun.
While it's a small scene, their interaction and his flirtatiousness offer a promising sense for his future--one that's squashed when his mother arrives with Marius.
Richard's "love" for Tyrell, here played off against the king's pretended affection for his wife, manifests itself in the film as a type of flirtatiousness with the ruthless young officer.
Moreover, as Bondi predicts above, she contributes to reinforcing normative notions of gender by choosing to display some of the most stereotypically gender-specific attitudes, such as masculine possessiveness and feminine flirtatiousness.
It is through her eyes that we experience what could have come across as clichE[umlaut]d innocence, but in this beautifully complex narrative, is a testimony to the flirtatiousness and restlessness of youth.
It is not so much that one is an easy way of recognizing the other as it is that one stands in for the other: flirtatiousness, heedlessness, excess of all kinds--eating, drinking, laughing, talking, shopping, even dancing too much--in Mrs.
The survey, which polled 2,000 women on their attitudes to their confidence, sultriness and flirtatiousness in a variety of working situations from job interviews to asking for a pay rise.