flock

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flock

1
a body of Christians regarded as the pastoral charge of a priest, a bishop, the pope, etc.

flock

2
very small tufts of wool applied to fabrics, wallpaper, etc., to give a raised pattern

Flock

 

a herd of sheep that are cared for and pastured together. The animals in a flock are homogeneous in sex, age, and pedigree.

A flock of fine-wooled or semi-fine-wooled ewes contains from 600 to 700 head. Semi-coarse-wooled and coarse-wooled ewes are kept in flocks of 700 to 800 individuals. Flocks of rams raised for breeding purposes contain up to 200 head. Sheep pastured for fattening and wethers are in flocks made up of 900 or more individuals. Female lambs between four and 18 months of age are kept in flocks of 700 to 900 head. In steppe regions larger flocks are sometimes formed, and in central and northern regions somewhat smaller ones. On sheep-breeding farms the flocks are 15 to 20 percent smaller than those on commercial farms. A flock is tended by three or four shepherds.

flock

[fläk]
(textiles)
Pulverized wool, cotton, silk, or rayon fiber used to form velvety patterns on cloth.
Woolen or cotton refuse reduced by machinery and used to stuff furniture.
References in classic literature ?
If a second traveller had passed, he would have seen a strange thing, -- a shepherdess watching her flock, clad in a cashmere grown, with ear-rings and necklace of pearls, diamond pins, and buttons of sapphires, emeralds, and rubies.
The reports of the firearms became rapid, whole volleys rising from the plain, as flocks of more than ordinary numbers darted over the opening, shadowing the field like a cloud; and then the light smoke of a single piece would issue from among the leafless bushes on the mountain, as death was hurled on the retreat of the affrighted birds, who were rising from a volley, in a vain effort to escape.
So prodigious was the number of the birds that the scattering fire of the guns, with the hurling of missiles and the cries of the boys, had no other effect than to break off small flocks from the immense masses that continued to dart along the valley, as if the whole of the feathered tribe were pouring through that one pass.
Oliver as bad as the rest of them, firing into the flocks as if he was shooting down nothing but Mingo warriors.
The Prior of Emmet and those that belonged to him gathered together like a flock of frightened sheep when the scent of the wolf is nigh, while the Bishop of Hereford, laying aside his book, crossed himself devoutly.
If Numa had planned, he had planned well, for scarcely had he reached his position when the door opened and a herder's head was projected into the enclosure, the fellow evidently seeking an explanation of the disturbance among his flock.
These parrots always live in flocks, and commit great ravages on the corn-fields.
The farmer, seeing before him this figure in full armour brandishing a lance over his head, gave himself up for dead, and made answer meekly, "Sir Knight, this youth that I am chastising is my servant, employed by me to watch a flock of sheep that I have hard by, and he is so careless that I lose one every day, and when I punish him for his carelessness and knavery he says I do it out of niggardliness, to escape paying him the wages I owe him, and before God, and on my soul, he lies.
And Curdken went on telling the king what had happened upon the meadow where the geese fed; how his hat was blown away; and how he was forced to run after it, and to leave his flock of geese to themselves.
Ten minutes later, the flock had come within gunshot, and were making the air ring with their hoarse cries.
At nightfall he drove his flock back to the fold, saw that the gate was secure and retired to his cave for refreshment and for dreams.
Sometimes when there was a great rain, and the stream came out of its banks, compelling him to urge his terrified flock to the uplands, he interceded for the people in the cities which he had been told lay in the plain beyond the two blue hills forming the gateway of his valley.