flooding


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flooding

[′fləd·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Filling of ditches or covering of land with water during the raising of crops; rice, for example, must have occasional flooding to grow properly.
(chemical engineering)
Condition in a liquid-vapor counterflow device (such as a distillation column) in which the rate of vapor rise is such as to prevent liquid downflow, causing a buildup of the liquid (flooding) within the device.
(petroleum engineering)
Technique of increasing recovery of oil (secondary recovery) from a reservoir by injection of water into the formation to drive the oil toward producing wellholes. Also known as waterflooding.
(psychology)
A behavior therapy for phobias and other problems involving maladaptive anxiety, in which anxiety producers are presented in intense form (real or imagined) and continued until the stimuli no longer produce disabling anxiety.

Flooding

 

in military affairs, an obstacle created to compel the enemy to abandon an area he has occupied, to hinder his advance, to disrupt bridges and ferrying and landing operations, or to interrupt communications in the rear of the enemy. For flooding an army may use a water reservoir on a river or a tributary; a lake, a river, or a canal with a spillway that regulates water supply; or a sea or a gulf if the water level is higher than the land and is separated from it by dunes or dikes. Flooding was used in World War I and World War II.

flooding

1. The stratification of different-colored pigments in a paint film.
2. Introducing water, by gravity, into the backfill surrounding a pipe in order to compact the backfill.
3. A temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of normally dry land areas resulting from (a) the overflow of inland or tidal waters, or (b) the unusual and rapid accumulation of runoff of surface waters from any source.

flooding

Various denial-of-service techniques that saturate a critical resource, leading either to system failure or to the exclusion of legitimate access. See email bomb, Fraggle attack, smurf attack and SYN-flood attack.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to this investment, the EA has also made progress by using modern technology to improve the way it can warn people when flooding is possible.
Sarah is working on behalf of the Environment Agency and the Durham & Darlington Civil Contingencies Unit (CCU) to increase flood resilience in areas at risk of flooding.
The campaign is calling for spending of PS1bn a year on flood defences by 2025, a zero tolerance approach to inappropriate new developments in flood-risk areas and cross-party political consensus on long term solutions for tackling flooding.
Flooding does not just occur when rivers burst their banks.
8m of which are at risk from flooding due to surface water, according to the Environment Agency.
However, surprisingly many people take no steps whatsoever to safeguard their home against the increasing risk of flooding.
Ron Davis, an Illinois state mitigation officer for FEMA, said an at-grade structure in a 100-year flood plain has a 30 percent chance of flooding during its 30-year mortgage: The chance of fire occurring during that same time period is 1 percent.
Along Los Angeles County's beaches, county and city fire departments used bulldozers to push up sand berms to keep high tides and waves from flooding coastal areas.
Whether you think you need it, or live in an area not susceptible to flooding, flood insurance is vital because flooding can damage your home and your financial future.
In August 2002, parts of central Europe experienced unprecedented flooding after record rains fell upon saturated soils and brimming reservoirs.
It's a clear, calm night--no storms, no wind, no unusual weather of any kind--but Venice's Piazza San Marco is flooding.