Florid

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Florid

Highly ornate; extremely rich to the point of being overly decorated.

florid

Highly ornate; extremely rich to the point of overdecoration.
References in periodicals archive ?
The war on drugs was becoming a ubiquitous metaphor, used by the media, politicians, and citizens in everyday talk and elaborated floridly in references to "battle plans," "fronts," and "enemies.
Sub-Byronic, lyrical, non-specifically exotic (if only in the name of the character addressed), from the same non-canonical Romantic culture as Thomas Campbell, (44) the poem seems now at once tepid and floridly out of control despite all its 'dear resplendencies'.
Prisoners in long-term segregation units often experience extreme suffering, and those who have serious mental illness frequently decompensate and become floridly psychotic.
28) As one reviewer observes, Ratzinger "parts company with the critical majority in treating even this floridly mythological episode as a historical event no more problematical for open-minded historians than Jesus' birth in Palestine.
Early in 1962, in the same year that Fischer moved back into his mother's apartment, Robert, following a drug-enhanced cross-country trip to California, where he lived for six months, moved back into our parents' apartment, became floridly psychotic, attempted to kill our father, was taken away in a straitjacket, and was incarcerated in a psychiatric ward at Elmhurst Hospital in Queens.
The Polish soprano Aleksandra Kurzak looked and sounded perfect as Aspasia, the woman wanted by both father and sons, with no hint of strain in the role's many floridly decorated passages.
There is something jarring about these covers--so similar, so beautiful, so floridly pornographic.
Hemingway's remark in Death in the Afternoon that Faulkner's stories are told floridly rather than "baldly" anticipated his later criticism of Faulkner's literary trickery in the 1950s.
Far from being a conservative or what Michael Valdez Moses has floridly if misleadingly termed "the eminence grise of Latin American neoliberalism" (2002: 1), (5) he is, by his own definition, a classical liberal who upholds "the basic precepts of liberalism--political democracy, the market economy, and the defense of individual interests over those of the state" (2005: 3).
He floridly plays to the cameras as his own investigation into the crime is re-enacted.
There is a subclass of criminal, which is floridly emotional and that emotionality is almost always associated with grotesque and extreme acting out.