flow soldering

flow soldering

[′flō ‚säd·ə·riŋ]
(engineering)
Soldering of printed circuit boards by moving them over a flowing wave of molten solder in a solder bath; the process permits precise control of the depth of immersion in the molten solder and minimizes heating of the board. Also known as wave soldering.
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A new flow soldering machine has been installed to enable it to increase the scale of production and to ensure superior quality control.
Our investment in a new flow soldering machine provides us with greater quality in our finishing line and has also speeded up our processes.
com) vice president of technology and SPVC chairman Karl Seelig, "Take Action Limits, also known as 'dump pot specifications,' are very important to any electronics manufacturing company using flow soldering techniques either in selective soldering or wave soldering.
These resistors have an operating temperature range from--55[degrees]C to +125[degrees]C, and are suitable for re-flow and flow soldering.
However, when using conventional soldering irons or flow soldering machines(*6), under filling of the through-hole can occur due to lack of heat or non-stable solder filling.
OKI's "static pressure soldering technology" successfully solders though-holes by controlling the solder liquid level to solve these flow soldering issues and by controlling the depth of dip(*8) of PWB.
HSOP package enables flow soldering on a paper phenolic board whose demand is increasing for the reduction of PCB cost.
When the ends of all vertical and horizontal microstrip lines come in contact, the housing is heated to 170 |degrees~ for flow soldering of all such microstrip contacts.
Wave soldering, or flow soldering (as it was called in its early days), has been around for about 50 years (1).
The term flow soldering was a registered trademark of Fry's Metals.
If one wanted to work at about the same temperatures as used during flow soldering, this yields the following calculation for eutectic SnPb solder: