flowstone


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flowstone

[′flō‚stōn]
(geology)
Deposits of calcium carbonate that accumulated against the walls of a cave where water flowed on the rock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Uranium-series and radiocarbon dating of flowstone above and below a large painted deer head at Baiyunwan yielded a maximum age of 5738 years BP and a minimum of 2050 years.
Cover Styrofoam cones, boxes, or cardboard with papier-mache, and then paint and varnish them to create stalagmites, flowstone, and other deposits.
A further sample, taken in June 2011 from the same flowstone deposit, revealed a minimum date of 14,505 years BP, plus or minus 560 years.
For some reason, and by complete coincidence, the person who engraved this art over 12,000 years ago did so on a piece of rock where a flowstone later grew over it, which is the only reason we could work out its history.
Approximately 100 mature fronds and 50 individuals were growing on a wet flowstone wall of a vertical cave approximately 6 m below the entrance.
The concert is sponsored by Flowstone, a monthly publication that chronicles sustainable living techniques.
Just as easily, it could have been stumbled upon by hooligans desirous of bagging a goofy stalagmite for the mantelpiece, or of leaving behind a girlfriend's name etched into centuries-old flowstone ooze.
Prescott is the sole proprietor of his firm, Flowstone, based at Waterford Road in Prenton, which specialises in the application of specialist floor paints and coatings for domestic and industrial clients and had taken on Richard Welsh in March, 2004.
Stalactites, stalagmites and flowstone deposits adorn the floors, walls and ceilings of the cavern.
381), but also in caves on dripstone and flowstone speleothems composed of calcite, epsomite, goethite, and even mud.
The flowstone rippled softly down the walls, and the snowy rock crystals twinkled in our lamp beams, as if sparked by an intense chemical reaction.
Lehman Caves took an estimated 600 million years to become what they are today, each extraordinary hollow containing variations of stalactites, stalagmites, bacon strips, cave coral, shields, flowstone, and gravity-abusers called helictites.