flyby

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flyby

(flÿ -bÿ) A trajectory that takes a spaceprobe close to a planet or satellite but does not permit it to enter an orbit about the body or land on it.

flyby

[′flī‚bī]
(aerospace engineering)
A close approach of a space vehicle to a target planet in which the vehicle does not impact the planet or go into orbit around it. Also known as swing-by.
References in periodicals archive ?
All instruments are off, and the planned science data collection for todays close flyby of Jupiter (perijove 2), did not occur.
Mission scientists are hopeful data from that flyby will provide evidence of how much hydrothermal activity is occurring in the moon's ocean, along with more detailed insights about the ocean's chemistry -- both of which relate to the potential habitability of Enceladus.
The flybys are the latest escalation in an increasingly tense test of wills between China and Japan for dominance of the East China Sea, which includes a group of uninhabited islets that both nations claim.
reported that anomalous orbital-energy changes have been observed during six spacecraft flyby s of the Earth [1].
On the other hand, both the MESSENGER and Mariner 10 flybys suggested that the planet has cooled substantially over time.
An analysis of data collected during the January flyby of the spacecraft MESSENGER--which will begin a year-long orbit of Mercury in 2011-has revealed the origin of the planet's magnetic field, discovered evidence of early volcanic activity and provided a first look at the planet's surface composition.
The successful flyby "is fundamental to the mission," said spacecraft operations manager Andrea Accomazzo.
The London Observer reported that our asteroid flyby scheme could be implemented as a short-term fix to global warming.
Since arriving at Jupiter in late 1995, the Galileo spacecraft has made 15 flybys of the planet's moons.
During its nearly seven-year journey to Saturn, Cassini had an opportunity to perform flybys of Earth, Venus, and Jupiter.
These flybys included the mission's last close brushes with Hyperion, Dione and Enceladus.
During its first two flybys of Mercury, the spacecraft captured images confirming that the planet's early history was marked by pervasive volcanism.