Foil


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foil

1
Hunting any scent that obscures the trail left by a hunted animal

foil

2
1. metal in the form of very thin sheets
2. the thin metallic sheet forming the backing of a mirror
3. Architect a small arc between cusps, esp as used in Gothic window tracery
4. short for aerofoil, hydrofoil

Foil

 

a fencing weapon used in sport that consists of a flexible steel blade and a handle, which has a grip and a protective cuplike guard. The blade has a variable rectangular cross section that tapers toward the tip, where a point measuring 6 mm in diameter is affixed. The overall length of the foil does not exceed 110 cm, and the length of the blade does not exceed 90 cm. The total weight does not exceed 500 g. Ordinary (training) foils have a fixed point. In electrified foils, used in official fencing competitions since 1954, an electronic contact device is attached to the blade.


Foil

 

a metal sheet from 5 to 1,000 mm wide and from 0.001 to 0.2 mm thick, made from nonferrous, rare, and noble metals and steel. The traditional method of producing foils with thicknesses greater than 0.02 mm is by rolling and transverse stretching on machines with four, six or 12 rollers; thinner foils, with thicknesses from 0.0045 to 0.01 mm, are manufactured by rolling two sheets together and subsequently parting the two. In producing foils of minimum thickness from materials that have poor formability and therefore are difficult or impossible to roll, molten metal is evaporated in a vacuum and the vapor is condensed and deposited on a special backing, which is subsequently removed. The technique is also used to produce bimetallic foils and foils with multiple layers of different metals or alloys.

Aluminum foil is the most common type of foil; it is produced in many varieties: smooth, embossed, uncoated, anodized, etched, varnished, and colored. Some foils are bonded to paper, film, or fabric backings to provide improved wear characteristics and to conserve metal. Foils are used for capacitor linings, radio tube plates, cable shielding, radio equipment, resistance sensors, printing plates, and honeycomb fillers for aircraft sound-absorption components. They are also used for packaging food, tobacco, perfume, and chemical products.

REFERENCE

Cherniak, S. N., V. I. Karasevich, and P. A. Kovalenko. Proizvodstvofol’gi, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1968.

M. Z. ERMANOK


Foil

 

in printing, a rolled, laminated material used for embossing, consisting of a paper or Lavsan base with wax, pigment (or metal), and adhesive layers. In embossing, the high temperature of the stamp melts the wax at the image sites, and the exposed pigment layer on the base is applied under pressure to the subject material. Aluminum foil is used in making printing plates and in Multilith operations; prior to the mid-1950’s, brass and gold foils were used for embossing book covers.

foil

[fȯil]
(metallurgy)
A thin sheet of metal, usually less than 0.006 inch (0.15 millimeter) thick.

foil

foils
1. In tracery, any of several rounded lobes that meet each other in points called cusps; widely used in Gothic architecture, Gothic Revival architecture, and Collegiate Gothic; see trefoil (three lobes), quatrefoil (four lobes), cinquefoil (five lobes), and multifoil (usually greater than five lobes).
2. A metallic substance formed into very thin sheets, usually by a rolling process.

FOIL

File Oriented Interpretive Language. CAI language.

["FOIL - A File Oriented Interpretive Language", J.C. Hesselbart, Proc ACM 23rd National Conf (1968)].
References in classic literature ?
But we shall, on the present occasion, carefully avoid polishing the antithesis in question, but shall proceed to draw another picture as minutely as possible, to serve as foil and counterfoil to the one in the preceding chapter.
Those dark, purple-faced people are an excellent foil.
When the King, with his gentlemen, entered the armory he was still smarting from the humiliation of De Montfort's reproaches, and as he laid aside his surcoat and plumed hat to take the foils with De Fulm his eyes alighted on the master of fence, Sir Jules de Vac, who was advancing with the King's foil and helmet.
Roasted peacocks, with the feathers all carefully replaced, so that the bird lay upon the dish even as it had strutted in life, boars' heads with the tusks gilded and the mouth lined with silver foil, jellies in the shape of the Twelve Apostles, and a great pasty which formed an exact model of the king's new castle at Windsor--these were a few of the strange dishes which faced him.
But, as if he disdained the usual artifices of his people, he bore none of those strange and horrid devices, with which the children of the forest are accustomed, like the more civilised heroes of the moustache, to back their reputation for courage, contenting himself with a broad and deep shadowing of black, that served as a sufficient and an admirable foil to the brighter gleamings of his native swarthiness.
Nay, he made this foil of his so very widely known, that third parties took it up, and handled it on some occasions with considerable briskness.
You can be, again, a foil to his pretty daughter, a slave to her pleasant wilfulness, and a toy in the house showing the goodness of the family.
D'Artagnan at first took these weapons for foils, and believed them to be buttoned; but he soon perceived by certain scratches that every weapon was pointed and sharpened, and that at each of these scratches not only the spectators, but even the actors themselves, laughed like so many madmen.
There were collected and piled up all Albert's successive caprices, hunting-horns, bass-viols, flutes -- a whole orchestra, for Albert had had not a taste but a fancy for music; easels, palettes, brushes, pencils -- for music had been succeeded by painting; foils, boxing-gloves, broadswords, and single-sticks -- for, following the example of the fashionable young men of the time, Albert de Morcerf cultivated, with far more perseverance than music and drawing, the three arts that complete a dandy's education, i.
And they both went into a low room where there were foils, gloves, masks, breastplates, and all the accessories for a fencing match.
Benevolence, devotedness, enthusiasm, were her antipathies; for dissimulation and self-interest she had a preference--they were real wisdom in her eyes; moral and physical degradation, mental and bodily inferiority, she regarded with indulgence; they were foils capable of being turned to good account as set-offs for her own endowments.
The ladies themselves seem so sensible of this, that they are all industrious to procure foils: nay, they will become foils to themselves; for I have observed (at Bath particularly) that they endeavour to appear as ugly as possible in the morning, in order to set off that beauty which they intend to show you in the evening.