food irradiation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

food irradiation

[′füd i‚rā·dē¦ā·shən]
(food engineering)
The treatment of fresh or processed foods with ionizing radiation that inactivates biological contaminants (insects, molds, parasites, or bacteria), rendering foods safe to consume and extending their storage lifetime.
References in periodicals archive ?
Food irradiation, designed to reduce bacteria, exposes food to ionizing radiation through gamma rays (produced by radioactive materials), X-rays, or electron-beams.
In response to an increased use of food irradiation technology in Australia the public interest group Food Irradiation Watch is organising a speaking tour of east coast centres to highlight the risks and impacts of this controversial technique.
A spring 2002 study by Texas A&M University (TAMU) investigated some Texas consumers' knowledge and acceptance of food irradiation and the effects of information about food irradiation on consumer acceptance and willingness to pay for irradiated ground beef.
Food Irradiation Specialist with MDS Nordion, a large company that operates several irradiation facilities in Canada and the United States.
The University of Wisconsin Food Irradiation Education Web site:
Some observers believe that the large body of evidence supporting the benefits of food irradiation is helping increase consumer acceptance.
During a three-day meeting that was closed to the public in November at the World Health Organization, the International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation (ICGFI) decided that the maximum radiation dose for food could be eliminated without posing additional hazards to people.
This effectively delayed commercialization of food irradiation for several decades, because authorizing regulation that prescribed safe use conditions and premarket review, as well as acceptance by the FDA, was required for each specific food use.
In a petition filed with the Food and Drug Administration, the 28 members of the Food Irradiation Coalition say extending the technique into new areas would help make foods safer.
As you listen to the debate unleashed by Whitney's straberries, keep this in mind: Food irradiation is 1) not as horrible as its critics charge, 2) not the godsend that its proponents claim, and 3) not the way to solve our food-safety problems.
Despite AFA's absence, the inside of the book is populated with brief descriptions and membership information on familiar groups like the Sierra Club and Wilderness Society to the less familiar Elmwood Institute (a California think tank) and the National Coalition to Stop Food Irradiation.
Full browser ?