foot rot


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Related to foot rot: trench foot

foot rot

[′fu̇t ‚rät]
(plant pathology)
Any disease that involves rotting of the stem or trunk of a plant.
(veterinary medicine)
References in periodicals archive ?
The skin around the feet become soft and tender when wet, so foot rot is a common problem in wet weather or when cattle must walk through wet ground or bogs.
When a ewe has had more than one bout of foot rot in a season she should be given a cull tag.
are the main bacterial pathogens for foot rot, or infectious pododermatitis.
Because the Babydoll Southdowns are an ancient breed, one of the oldest known to man, they are not prone to many of the modern sheep problems and are quite resistant to foot rot.
And the inside of the boot draws moisture away from the skin, cutting out foot rot.
Desert combat suits and boots were in short supply and regular boots melted, fell apart and caused foot rot, not seen since the trenches of World War I.
Some troops chose to buy their own footwear, but commanders complained that foot rot was still a 'major issue'.
Melted boots left troops with foot rot associated with the First World War.
Because of the bacteriostatic properties of the pHarlo technology contained in Unifresh(TM) Footbath concentrate, the product also helps control bacteria and fungus that infects the hooves of cows causing digital dermatitis and interdigital papillomatosis, also known as hairy heel warts and foot rot.
The lambs were examined by a veterinary officer and diagnosed to be suffering from chronic foot rot, causing them to be severely lame and non-weight bearing on the affected limb.
According to the brothers, using dry woodchip rather than imported strawis cheaper and has reduced livestock foot rot when used indoors.
Indeed, I believe the Australians have totally eliminated foot rot from the national flock by this method.