footprint


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footprint

1. Computing the amount of resources such as disk space and memory, that an application requires
2. an identifying characteristic on land or water, such as the area in which an aircraft's sonic boom can be heard or the area covered by the down-blast of a hovercraft

Footprint

The projected area of a building or piece of equipment on a horizontal surface.

footprint

[′fu̇t‚print]
(building construction)
A description of the exact size, shape, and location of a building's foundation as the foundation has been installed on a specific site. Also known as building footprint.
(communications)
The area of the earth's surface that can be covered by a communications satellite at any given time.
(computer science)
The amount and shape of the area occupied by equipment, such as a terminal or microcomputer, on desktop, floor, or other surface area.

footprint

The area on a plane directly beneath a structure (or piece of equipment), that has the same perimeter as the structure (or piece of equipment).

footprint

(jargon, hardware)
The floor or desk area taken up by a piece of hardware.

footprint

(jargon, storage)
The amount of disk or RAM taken up by a program or file.

footprint

(3)
(IBM) The audit trail left by a crashed program (often "footprints").

See also toeprint.

footprint

The amount of geographic space covered by an object. A computer footprint is the desk or floor surface it occupies. A satellite's footprint is the earth area covered by its downlink. An application's footprint is the amount of memory (RAM) it requires. See form factor. See also memory footprint and digital footprint.
References in classic literature ?
From what we knew of von Schoenvorts, we would not have been surprised at anything from him; but the footprints by the spring seemed indisputable evidence that one of Caprona's undeveloped men had borne off the girl I loved.
Had he had the necessary knowledge and the wit of eye-observance, he would have noted that the footprint was smaller than a man's and that the toeprints were different from a Mary's in that they were close together and did not press deeply into the earth.
And after they had gone a good many miles, one of them found peculiar footprints near the edge of a river; and they knew that a pushmi-pullyu must be very near that spot.
Further away towards the dimness, it appeared to be broken by a number of small narrow footprints.
Here they soon came upon numerous footprints, and the carcasses of buffaloes; by which they knew there must be Indians not far off.
of Barrymore that his master's footprints altered their
When I went upstairs with him he pointed to several footprints upon the light carpet.
And when, also, the monk at the church of San Sebastian showed us a paving-stone with two great footprints in it and said that Peter's feet made those, we lacked confidence again.
As they hurried on, they had not taken notice of certain large footprints and fresh tracks of some living creature marked here and there in the damp soil.
In the soft mud on the bank of a tiny rivulet he found footprints such as he alone in all the jungle had ever made, but much larger than his.
He walked along the meadow, dragging his feet, rustling the grass, and gazing at the dust that covered his boots; now he took big strides trying to keep to the footprints left on the meadow by the mowers, then he counted his steps, calculating how often he must walk from one strip to another to walk a mile, then he stripped the flowers from the wormwood that grew along a boundary rut, rubbed them in his palms, and smelled their pungent, sweetly bitter scent.
If you don't think it's lonesome wandering all by yourself through savage, unknown Pellucidar, why, just try it, and you will not wonder that I was glad of the company of this first dog--this living replica of the fierce and now extinct hyaenodon of the outer crust that hunted in savage packs the great elk across the snows of southern France, in the days when the mastodon roamed at will over the broad continent of which the British Isles were then a part, and perchance left his footprints and his bones in the sands of Atlantis as well.