forced drying

forced drying

A process for speeding up the drying of paint, using a moderate heat, up to 150°F (65°C).
References in periodicals archive ?
I recommend that the novice put off forced drying till they gain experience with the products.
The authors explained that this new technology has already been successfully implemented to accelerate formulations at low curing temperatures, and to increase productivity of coatings processes under forced drying conditions.
From this figure it is clear that if we want to have an acceptable film formation under forced drying conditions (approximately 60[degrees]C), the VOC levels of the coating will be unacceptably high.
Advantages: good corrosion protection; excellent gloss/UV resistance; fast drying and recoating time; good hardness development; good chemical resistance (ISO 12944); high flash point; good adhesion to coatings and metals; low dirt pick up (topcoats); high degree of flexibility; non-chalking and non-yellowing; very good water-resistance; competitive in price; and suitable for forced drying.
The heating equipment is capable of controlling temperatures at 21[degrees]C for spraying and 70[degrees]C for forced drying and a local paint kitchen has been installed to provide spray operators with an area for paint storage and mixing operations.
Thus, a primer is applied to the preheated (100-190 [degrees] F) metal part Forced drying at 190 [degrees] F for 5-15 minutes has also proven to be advantageous.
The water-based adhesive is reported to provide an immediate bond without forced drying equipment and is available in 5-gal pails and 55-gal drums.
The soft-feel coating is sprayed onto the film and cured by means of forced drying at 80[degrees]C.
The latter-features on-line three-stage spray pre-treatment plant which degreases, iron phosphates, and rinses the metal components followed by forced drying before delivery to the on-line paint facilities.