foremast


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Related to foremast: mizzen, mizzenmast, masted

foremast

the mast nearest the bow on vessels with two or more masts
References in periodicals archive ?
Each of these has a raised deck aft and is rigged with three masts: a centrally located mainmast, with a square sail and a top square sail on a topmast, a foremast placed near the stem with similar rigging, and a smaller mast just forward of the tiller with a lateen sail.
On the leg of the journey from Simonstown in the Cape to Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, a violent storm took away the ship's foremast and subsequently fire broke out in one of the holds.
Realization of the glass wall to the trinquet Stella high school (gymnasium) - Piton Saint-Leu in Reunion: These describe the structure of the inner glass wall allowing separation between the foremast of the playing field and the stands .
The Navy stopped flying Union Jacks from the jackstaff on the bow about 50 years before Trafalgar, but Nelson ordered the ships to fly from the foremast during the battle to aid instant recognition and avoid friendly fire.
The child rises, her body an even brighter patch in the transparent air; her voice shrills out, stumbling over the first notes, like the shudder of a sail before it is hoisted on the foremast.
According to The Kauaeranga Valley by Allan Berry (2007), the first record of Pakeha (European) use of the kauri tree was in 1772 when it was used for a ship's foremast.
Sporting "a large flag on her foremast," probably a flag of recognition to alert friendly vessels, Pillsbury swung to starboard, frantically trying to escape the cascade of shells.
The ships left at the end of two bountiful weeks, but returned to the bay for repairs within days after the foremast of the Resolution was damaged in a storm.
He climbs the cable of a seventy-foot-high foremast of a big pleasure ship on Biscayne Bay to rescue a man about to plunge to his death, only to see his own kin and community turn his heroism into betrayal of his people.
With only her foremast left standing, Rotheram nursed the crippled ship through the post-Trafalgar storm to Gibraltar.
She's an experienced sailor, raised in Portugal, where sailors from the fishing village taught her all the secrets of jib and foremast, as well as other mysteries of sailing the wind and sea, now and then in one's favor.