forms


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forms

[fȯrmz]
(computer science)
Web pages that allow users to fill in and submit information, they are written in HTML and processed by CGI scripts.

forms

(programming)

forms

(library)
(Xforms) A GUI component library for X11.
References in classic literature ?
I conclude, looking to the future, that for terrestrial productions a large continental area, which will probably undergo many oscillations of level, and which consequently will exist for long periods in a broken condition, will be the most favourable for the production of many new forms of life, likely to endure long and to spread widely.
The existence of such places will often depend on physical changes, which are generally very slow, and on the immigration of better adapted forms having been checked.
In fact, the only occasions on which they cared about the matter were the monthly examinations, when the Doctor came round to examine their form, for one long, awful hour, in the work which they had done in the preceding month.
The blow was not a hard one, but the boy was so taken by surprise that he started back; the form caught the back of his knees, and over he went on to the floor behind.
But it was not sufficient," say the adversaries of the proposed Constitution, "for the convention to adhere to the republican form.
The eventual election, again, is to be made by that branch of the legislature which consists of the national representatives; but in this particular act they are to be thrown into the form of individual delegations, from so many distinct and coequal bodies politic.
In the first case, if inevitability were possible without freedom we should have reached a definition of inevitability by the laws of inevitability itself, that is, a mere form without content.
In the second case, if freedom were possible without inevitability we should have arrived at unconditioned freedom beyond space, time, and cause, which by the fact of its being unconditioned and unlimited would be nothing, or mere content without form.
This is the spirit of idealism, which in the history of philosophy has had many names and taken many forms, and has in a measure influenced those who seemed to be most averse to it.
There they see the divine forms of justice, temperance, and the like, in their unchangeable beauty, but not without an effort more than human.
Not only the grand features in the structure of barrier-reefs and of atolls, and to their likeness to each other in form, size, and other characters, are explained on the theory of subsidence -- which theory we are independently forced to admit in the very areas in question, from the necessity of finding bases for the corals within the requisite depth -- but many details in structure and exceptional cases can thus also be simply explained.
I will not enter on many more details; but I must remark that the curious structure of the northern Maldiva atolls receives (taking into consideration the free entrance of the sea through their broken margins) a simple explanation in the upward and outward growth of the corals, originally based both on small detached reefs in their lagoons, such as occur in common atolls, and on broken portions of the linear marginal reef, such as bounds every atoll of the ordinary form.