four-factor formula

four-factor formula

[¦fȯr ¦fak·tər ′fȯr·myə·lə]
(nucleonics)
The principle that the multiplication factor of a thermal reactor with no leakage is the product of the average number of fast neutrons emitted when a nucleus in the fuel material captures a thermal neutron, the fast fission factor, the fraction of neutrons which are not captured while being slowed down, and the number of thermal neutrons absorbed in the fuel divided by the total number of neutrons absorbed in the fuel and the moderator.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The concept includes four-factor formula at the borders, namely communication, cooperation, coordination, and collaboration.
The 2005/2006 New York State Budget Act marks the end of the long-standing four-factor formula used in computing the business allocation factor for the corporation business franchise tax under Article 9-A of the New York Tax Law and the entire net income (ENI) allocation percentage for the bank franchise tax under Article 32.
The Budget Act replaces the four-factor formula used in the corporation business franchise tax and the bank franchise tax with a single-factor, receipts-based formula.
Iowa, for example, uses only a single factor (sales), while New Mexico uses the prototypical three-factor formula and, in the case of manufacturers, allows for the use of a four-factor formula by double weighting the sales factor.
The four-factor formula used in computing the business allocation percentage was repealed and replaced with a single-factor sales formula that will be phased in over a three-year period, beginning with taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2006, as follows:
The four-factor formula used in computing the allocation percentage was repealed and replaced with a single-factor sales formula.