fourteen


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fourteen

1. the cardinal number that is the sum of ten and four
2. a numeral, 14, XIV, etc., representing this number
References in classic literature ?
Introduced to Number Fourteen, the doctor looked round him with a certain appearance of interest which was noticed by everyone present.
Well; for these twenty-eight leagues you cannot allow less than fourteen hours?
I was only fourteen, and had never been on the ocean in my life.
Their modified descendants, fourteen in number at the fourteen-thousandth generation, will probably have inherited some of the same advantages: they have also been modified and improved in a diversified manner at each stage of descent, so as to have become adapted to many related places in the natural economy of their country.
By giving the balloon these cubic dimensions, and filling it with hydrogen gas, instead of common air--the former being fourteen and a half times lighter and weighing therefore only two hundred and seventy-six pounds--a difference of three thousand seven hundred and twenty-four pounds in equilibrium is produced; and it is this difference between the weight of the gas contained in the balloon and the weight of the surrounding atmosphere that constitutes the ascensional force of the former.
He was now, as we have said, three-and-thirty years of age, and his fourteen years' imprisonment had produced a great transformation in his appearance.
In the morning I started for the saltpetre-works, a distance of fourteen leagues.
Then he called all the tailors in the kingdom together, and made them sit down for fourteen days sewing at a sack.
He indicated the stud farms at which Nicholas might procure horses, recommended to him a horse dealer in the town and a landowner fourteen miles out of town who had the best horses, and promised to assist him in every way.
yet he had devoted fourteen days to saving the life of John Francis.
Fourteen years ago I scraped together the wretched means of existence in this very town by reading the newspaper (with explanatory comments) to the company at a public-house.
This Venice, which was a haughty, invincible, magnificent Republic for nearly fourteen hundred years; whose armies compelled the world's applause whenever and wherever they battled; whose navies well nigh held dominion of the seas, and whose merchant fleets whitened the remotest oceans with their sails and loaded these piers with the products of every clime, is fallen a prey to poverty, neglect and melancholy decay.