fourth-generation computer

fourth-generation computer

[′fȯrth ‚jen·ə¦rā·shən kəm′pyüd·ər]
(computer science)
A type of general-purpose digital computer used in the 1970s and 1980s that is characterized by increasingly advanced very large-scale integrated circuits and increasing use of a hierarchy of memory devices.

fourth-generation computer

A computer made up almost entirely of chips with limited amounts of discrete components. We are currently nearing the end of the fourth generation. See computer generations.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was accomplished by introduction of PS-2000 and VS-2 fourth-generation computers, which brought the overall productivity of the Flight Control Center information computing complex up to 50 million operations per second.