foveal vision


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foveal vision

[¦fō·vē·əl ′vizh·ən]
(physiology)
Vision achieved by looking directly at objects in the daylight so that the image falls on or near the fovea centralis. Also known as photopic vision.
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Post hoc comparisons showed that participants using foveal vision had the highest error rate, 4.
These results show that physiological inequalities, such as the larger cortical area being devoted to foveal vision rather than to parafoveal and peripheral vision, do not lead to psychological inequalities.
Indeed, low latency multitask operation under disparate conditions may have very well been the principle evolutionary driver of foveal vision in the biological setting.
Research efforts at Amherst Systems and at the State University of New York at Buffalo have demonstrated how foveal vision attributes in the machine setting can significantly improve machine vision system performance.
As the activation of foveal vision increased, peripheral performance decreased equally at all peripheral locations as a result of the decrease of the bandwidth of attention.
The time interval between the presentation of the fixation point of foveal vision and the presentation of the stimulus at the periphery was randomized.
On the other hand, if good visual acuity indicates that foveal vision has been spared so far, one can use a central fixation mark.
The preferred area for eccentric viewing based on potential acuity is between the area of loss of foveal vision and the outer ring; however, this will reduce the field of vision available for use.
This twilight envelope can serve as a functional benchmark in which foveal vision for ordinary objects (i.
One major contributor to the problem is an increasing reliance in feedback design on foveal vision -- an approach that fails to support pilots in tracking system-induced changes and events while performing concurrent flight-related tasks (Sarter, 2000; Sarter & Woods, 1997).
Considering the experience effects, however, it is not sufficient to speak only of learning to use peripheral vision rather than foveal vision in lane keeping.
This interpretation agrees with the findings of other researchers, who found only minor increases in saccadic duration and amplitude when foveal vision was obscured by an artificial scotoma (Bertera, 1988; Murphy and Foley-Fisher, 1989).