fracture cleavage

fracture cleavage

[′frak·shər ‚klēv·ij]
(geology)
Cleavage that occurs in deformed but only slightly metamorphosed rocks along closely spaced, parallel joints and fractures.
References in periodicals archive ?
a] in being a spaced, smooth fracture cleavage with lithons ranging in width between 0.
At two localities south of Moncton, these thick mudstone intervals carry two fracture cleavages that are almost perpendicular to each other, and perpendicular to bedding.
The early cleavages described here are fracture cleavages with evidence of shear, rather than true 'slaty' cleavages or their precursors.
Wood penetration and fracture cleavage adhesion were examined solely as a function of blend ratio.
The adhesive rheology, wood penetration, and fracture cleavage properties are reported in this paper, while cure and morphological properties will be discussed in a future paper.
Like all adhesion tests, fracture cleavage has certain advantages and disadvantages.
We mention this because neat pMDI forms extremely thin bonds, and is thus affected by bond thickness effects in fracture cleavage testing.
The PF-to-pMDI comparison shown here re-emphasizes two well known points: 1) an absolute PF-to-pMDI toughness comparison is invalid with fracture cleavage because of bond thickness effects arising from the extremely thin bonds characteristic of neat pMDI; and 2) the fundamental differences between these resins are demonstrated.