frequency tolerance

frequency tolerance

[′frē·kwən·sē ‚täl·ə·rəns]
(electronics)
Of a radio transmitter, extent to which the carrier frequency of the transmitter may be permitted to depart from the frequency assigned.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, the trend toward smaller, more functional, better-performing electronic devices is also fueling demand for clock oscillators that offer tighter frequency tolerance over a wider operating temperature range.
Frequency tolerance is typically A100pm at 25 degrees C.
Frequency tolerance at 25[degrees]C is [+ or -]10 ppm and their frequency stability vs.
the] first products already have achieved six-sigma process capability to provide [+ or -]50-ppm frequency tolerance including initial offset and long-term drift over the full industrial temperature range from -40[degrees]C to + 85[degrees]C.
This product is not as small as some ceramic oscillators, but it outperforms those ceramic oscillators in accuracy and stability, in frequency tolerance and frequency temperature characteristics at room temperature.
The ceramic resonator can be manufactured to a frequency tolerance of less than 0.
According to Agere the qualification was given after the W7020 met performance requirements in a series of tests designed to check the device`s frequency tolerance, power output, range and transmission.
Frequency tolerance is available down to [+ or -]10 ppm whilst frequency stability can be specified at -[+ or -]40 ppm over the full military temperature range of -55[degrees]C to 125[degrees]C down to -[+ or -]10 ppm over commercial temperature ranges coupled with low frequency aging characteristics.
Frequency tolerance at 25[degrees]C is -20 to +20 ppm and frequency stability is -0.
Motors have a fairly tight frequency tolerance requirement of plus or minus five percent.

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