fringing reef

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fringing reef

[¦frin·jiŋ ′rēf]
(geology)
A coral reef attached directly to or bordering the shore of an island or continental landmass.
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Benthic cyanobacteria were also present in six geomorphological zones (Back-reef terrace, Patch reefs, Pinnacles, Fringing reefs, Forereef terrace and Lagoon) and nine habitats.
For example, fringing reefs in Molokai Island can reach sedimentation values higher than 740 g/[cm.
Turbo is found commonly on fringing reefs and rocky shorelines.
The yellowbar angelfish Pomacanthus maculosus (Forsskal, 1775) is a reef-associated species inhabiting fringing reefs and lagoons and is regularly found over hard and soft bottoms (Randall, 1983; Carpenter et al.
It is up to 350km wide and has more than 2,000km of fringing reefs.
Hooks and lines are used to bait and catch fish from canoes, on fringing reefs or along river banks.
Where coral bleaching of our protective fringing reefs has occurred because of warming seas, replanting coral to restore coral gardens has begun.
Fringing reefs make for mellow snorkeling and reef fish concentrations that are higher than anywhere else in the state.
On Mauritius, the corals have been growing for millennia and encircle much of the island with fringing reefs and even a small barrier reef.
Shelburne Bay is one of the least disturbed areas of active parabolic silica sand dune systems in the world, and its warm, clean coastal waters with fringing reefs boast eight species of sea grass making the area essential habitat for dugongs (Dugon dugon) and green turtles (Chelonia midas).